Converging Evidence for Underlying Phonological Representation in a Child Who Misarticulates The liquid, fricative, and affricate sounds in the phonological system of a single misarticulating child were the focus of converging analyses. These analyses included structured measures of perceptual and productive skills, language sampling, and acoustic analysis of seemingly homophonous forms. The results of perceptual and productive tasks indicated that the ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1992
Converging Evidence for Underlying Phonological Representation in a Child Who Misarticulates
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Karla K. McGregor
    Purdue University West Lafayette, IN
  • Richard G. Schwartz
    City University of New York
Article Information
Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1992
Converging Evidence for Underlying Phonological Representation in a Child Who Misarticulates
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1992, Vol. 35, 596-603. doi:10.1044/jshr.3503.596
History: Received March 18, 1991 , Accepted February 26, 1992
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1992, Vol. 35, 596-603. doi:10.1044/jshr.3503.596
History: Received March 18, 1991; Accepted February 26, 1992

The liquid, fricative, and affricate sounds in the phonological system of a single misarticulating child were the focus of converging analyses. These analyses included structured measures of perceptual and productive skills, language sampling, and acoustic analysis of seemingly homophonous forms. The results of perceptual and productive tasks indicated that the child’s perception of certain sounds was superior to his productions, but for other sounds, productive skill was superior to perceptual performance This child’s errors of production could be attributed to nonadultlike underlying representations A two-lexicon model of underlying representation best accounted for the data. The findings led to inferences about the child’s underlying perceptual and articulatory knowledge of fricative, affricate, and liquid sounds.

Acknowledgments
We are grateful to N for his cooperative and always patient participation and to his parents for allowing him to participate. James Montgomery, Laurence Leonard, and Jackson Gandour provided insightful comments on an earlier draft of this manuscript. We also wish to thank Brenda Chapman for her assistance in data analysis. Portions of this paper were presented to the University of Wisconsin Symposium on Child Language Disorders, June 1989. The research was supported by a grant from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders R01-NS27041-01, “Input-Output Relationships in Specific Language Impairment.”
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access