Laryngeal Paralyses Theoretical Considerations and Effects on Laryngeal Vibration Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1992
Laryngeal Paralyses
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Marshall E. Smith
    Division of Head and Neck Surgery UCLA School of Medicine Los Angeles, CA, and Veterans Administration Medical Center, West Los Angeles Los Angeles, CA
  • Gerald S. Berke
    Division of Head and Neck Surgery UCLA School of Medicine Los Angeles, CA, and Veterans Administration Medical Center, West Los Angeles Los Angeles, CA
  • Bruce R. Gerratt
    Division of Head and Neck Surgery UCLA School of Medicine Los Angeles, CA, and Veterans Administration Medical Center, West Los Angeles Los Angeles, CA
  • Jody Kreiman
    Division of Head and Neck Surgery UCLA School of Medicine Los Angeles, CA, and Veterans Administration Medical Center, West Los Angeles Los Angeles, CA
Article Information
Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1992
Laryngeal Paralyses
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1992, Vol. 35, 545-554. doi:10.1044/jshr.3503.545
History: Received February 19, 1991 , Accepted August 19, 1991
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1992, Vol. 35, 545-554. doi:10.1044/jshr.3503.545
History: Received February 19, 1991; Accepted August 19, 1991

The neurological causes of vocal fold paralyses have been well documented. However, the effect of these disorders on laryngeal vibration is not well understood. A theoretical four-mass model of the larynx, based on the work of Ishizaka and Isshiki (1976) and Koizumi, Taniguchi, and Hiromitsu (1987), was developed and adapted to simulate laryngeal biomechanical behavior. The model was used to evaluate various states of asymmetric laryngeal vibration. Input parameters that relate observed laryngeal function and model simulation were developed. Laryngeal paralyses were simulated by their predicted effect on these parameters. Simulations were compared with available data on glottal vibration in laryngeal paralyses. Complex modes of vibration were seen with certain combinations of asymmetrical lower mass stiffness and initial glottal gap.

Acknowledgments
We thank Kristin Precoda for her spectral analyses of simulation results. Norma Antonanzas‐Barroso provided programming advice and technical support. This research was supported by Veterans Administration Medical Research funds.
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