Variability of Acoustic Segment Durations After Prolonged-Speech Treatment for Stuttering Existing literature suggests that one of the effects of treatment based on prolonged speech is increased durations of acoustic segments. However, the external validity of the data concerned may be questioned because the data were not based on spontaneous speech samples and were gathered from subjects with unknown treatment histories. ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1992
Variability of Acoustic Segment Durations After Prolonged-Speech Treatment for Stuttering
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Mark Onslow
    School of Communication Disorders The University of Sydney Sydney, Australia
  • Janis van Doorn
    School of Communication Disorders The University of Sydney Sydney, Australia
  • Denis Newman
    Department of Speech and Hearing The University of Queensland Brisbane, Australia
Article Information
Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1992
Variability of Acoustic Segment Durations After Prolonged-Speech Treatment for Stuttering
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1992, Vol. 35, 529-536. doi:10.1044/jshr.3503.529
History: Received January 7, 1991 , Accepted July 18, 1991
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1992, Vol. 35, 529-536. doi:10.1044/jshr.3503.529
History: Received January 7, 1991; Accepted July 18, 1991

Existing literature suggests that one of the effects of treatment based on prolonged speech is increased durations of acoustic segments. However, the external validity of the data concerned may be questioned because the data were not based on spontaneous speech samples and were gathered from subjects with unknown treatment histories. With this in mind, the present investigation used young clients with no history of treatment based on prolonged speech and obtained pretreatment and posttreatment acoustic measures from spontaneous speech samples. Acoustic measures showed no significant posttreatment increases in durations of acoustic segments. However, for the acoustic measure of vowel duration and a measure of articulation rate, posttreatment speech samples showed significantly reduced variability. The potential theoretical and practical relevance of these findings is discussed.

Acknowledgments
The authors express their appreciation to Michelle Lincoln, Ann Packman, and Elisabeth Harrison, who gave their time freely to assist in conducting this research.
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