ADC Bit Resolution A Response to Hamill and Barron Letter to the Editor
Letter to the Editor  |   April 01, 1992
ADC Bit Resolution
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Richard W. Harris
    Communication Sciences and Disorders Brigham Young University
  • Robert H. Brey
    Communication Sciences and Disorders Brigham Young University
  • Yuan-shu Chang
    Communication Sciences and Disorders Brigham Young University
  • B. Diann Soria
    Communication Sciences and Disorders Brigham Young University
  • Laurence M. Hilton
    Communication Sciences and Disorders Brigham Young University
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Hearing Disorders / Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Hearing / Letters to the Editor
Letter to the Editor   |   April 01, 1992
ADC Bit Resolution
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1992, Vol. 35, 478-479. doi:10.1044/jshr.3502478
History: Received May 30, 1991 , Accepted June 25, 1991
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1992, Vol. 35, 478-479. doi:10.1044/jshr.3502478
History: Received May 30, 1991; Accepted June 25, 1991
We appreciate the opportunity to respond to Hamill and Barron’s comments regarding our article “The Effects of Digital Quantization Error on Speech Intelligibility and Perceived Speech Quality” (Harris, Brey, Chang, Soria, & Hilton, 1991). Our understanding of their letter indicates that Hamill and Barron have three areas of concern regarding our study:
This letter provides us an opportunity to provide additional information regarding our apparatus and recording conditions. The signal‐to‐noise ratio (SNR) of the speech audiometer we used exceeds ANSI S3.6‐1989 specifications. The measured SNR for this audiometer was 55‐72 dB depending on attenuator level. In addition, the combined SNR of the Krohn‐Hite 3343 filter and speech audiometer was at least 55 dB. Our recordings were made in a large anechoic chamber where the noise floor is approximately 0 dB SPL at each 1/12 octave from 0.08 to 20.0 kHz. The speech stimuli were recorded by a male talker at a level of 65‐70 dB SPL yielding a stimulus SNR of at least 65 dB. The resulting SNR of the 16‐bit digitized speech stimuli was >55 dB in all cases.
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