Speechreading Performance Under Different Conditions of Video Image, Repetition, and Speech Rate Speechreading was assessed under different conditions of video image, repetition, and speech rate in three experiments on children who are deaf. The objective of the experiments was to obtain information for the design of interactive speechreading training programs using an interactive laser videodisc. Results of Experiment 1 showed that three ... Research Note
Research Note  |   April 01, 1992
Speechreading Performance Under Different Conditions of Video Image, Repetition, and Speech Rate
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Frans J. IJsseldijk
    Instituut voor Doven, Sint-Michielsgestel The Netherlands
Article Information
Audiologic / Aural Rehabilitation / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Hearing / Research Notes
Research Note   |   April 01, 1992
Speechreading Performance Under Different Conditions of Video Image, Repetition, and Speech Rate
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1992, Vol. 35, 466-471. doi:10.1044/jshr.3502.466
History: Received September 18, 1989 , Accepted April 18, 1991
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1992, Vol. 35, 466-471. doi:10.1044/jshr.3502.466
History: Received September 18, 1989; Accepted April 18, 1991

Speechreading was assessed under different conditions of video image, repetition, and speech rate in three experiments on children who are deaf. The objective of the experiments was to obtain information for the design of interactive speechreading training programs using an interactive laser videodisc. Results of Experiment 1 showed that three different video images of testers (Entire-Face, 2/3 Profile, and Lips-Only,) did not result in significantly different scores. Experiment 2 assessed which form of repetition (Entire-Face, 2/3 Profile, Lips-Only,) after the first Entire-Face presentation had the biggest effect on improving speechreading performance. The three different forms of repetition appeared to lead to a similar significant improvement. In Experiment 3, various speechreading stimuli were presented at four different speech rates. It appeared that these four speech rates did not significantly influence the speechreading scores. Results suggest that there is a wide range within which speaker-sender variables may vary without affecting the overall speechreading results.

Acknowledgments
This study was made possible by a grant from the Instituut voor Doven, Sint-Michielsgestel, The Netherlands. The author wishes to thank F. Marinus for making the videorecordings, A. Findhammer for presenting the speech stimuli, and L. Speth, E. van Os, and T. Wetzels for their help in testing the children. The author also thanks A. van den Wollenberg and W. Goossens for their statistical assistance; E. Andrews and M. Schakenraad for the English translation; and A. Thomassen, Professor of Experimental Psychology at the University of Nijmegen, The Netherlands, for his critical and helpful comments on previous drafts.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access