Open-Set Word Identification by an Adult With Profound Hearing Impairment Integration of Touch, Aided Hearing, and Speechreading Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 1992
Open-Set Word Identification by an Adult With Profound Hearing Impairment
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Michael P. Lynch
    University of Miami Mailman Center for Child Development Miami, FL
  • Rebecca E. Eilers
    University of Miami Mailman Center for Child Development Miami, FL
  • Patricia J. Pero
    University of Miami Mailman Center for Child Development Miami, FL
  • Currently affiliated with Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN.
    Currently affiliated with Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN.×
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Hearing Disorders / Audiologic / Aural Rehabilitation / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 1992
Open-Set Word Identification by an Adult With Profound Hearing Impairment
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1992, Vol. 35, 443-449. doi:10.1044/jshr.3502.443
History: Received March 6, 1991 , Accepted July 1, 1991
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1992, Vol. 35, 443-449. doi:10.1044/jshr.3502.443
History: Received March 6, 1991; Accepted July 1, 1991

The ability of an adult with profound hearing impairment to integrate speech information from touch, aided hearing, and speechreading in identification of open‐set words was investigated. A list was obtained of 735 words that the subject failed to identify using any single modality: touch, with either the Tacticon 1600, a multichannel electrocutaneous vocoder (TV), or the Tactaid II, a 2‐channel vibrotactile aid (TA); aided hearing (H); or speechreading (S). To test integration, observed word identification performance in combined‐modality conditions was compared with predicted performance calculated from single‐modality scores. Words were randomly assigned to seven conditions: (a) S+H, (b) H+TV, (c) H+TA, (d) S+TV, (d) S+TA, (e) S+TV+H, and (f) S+TA+H. Results indicated that the subject integrated speech information across modalities, with highest performance in the S+TV+H and S+TA+H conditions. Integration also occurred when both speechreading and touch were used and when both speechreading and aided hearing were used.

This research was supported by the Dade County Public Schools and by NIDRR grant G008720068 to Rebecca Eilers. The Tactaid II was provided by NIH/NINCDS SBIR grant R44NS20403‐03 to David Franklin at Audiological Engineering, Somerville, MA. Helpful comments that contributed to the development of this article were provided by Arthur Boothroyd, Carol De Filippo, Kenneth Grant, D. Kimbrough Oiler, Michele Steffens, and four anonymous reviewers. The results of this study were presented in November 1988 at the 116th meeting of the Acoustical Society of America, Honolulu, HI.
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