Temporal Resolution in Normal-Hearing and Hearing-Impaired Listeners Using Frequency-Modulated Stimuli This study compares the temporal resolution of frequency-modulated sinusoids by normal-hearing and hearing-impaired subjects in a discrimination task. One signal increased linearly by 200 Hz in 50 msec. The other was identical except that its trajectory followed a series of discrete steps. Center frequencies were 500, 1000, 2000, and 4000 ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 1992
Temporal Resolution in Normal-Hearing and Hearing-Impaired Listeners Using Frequency-Modulated Stimuli
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • John P. Madden
    Division of Speech and Hearing Science The Ohio State University Columbus, OH
  • Lawrence L. Feth
    Division of Speech and Hearing Science The Ohio State University Columbus, OH
  • Currently affiliated with the Speech and Hearing Department, Cleveland State University, Cleveland, Ohio.
    Currently affiliated with the Speech and Hearing Department, Cleveland State University, Cleveland, Ohio.×
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Hearing Disorders / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 1992
Temporal Resolution in Normal-Hearing and Hearing-Impaired Listeners Using Frequency-Modulated Stimuli
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1992, Vol. 35, 436-442. doi:10.1044/jshr.3502.436
History: Received February 1, 1991 , Accepted June 7, 1991
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1992, Vol. 35, 436-442. doi:10.1044/jshr.3502.436
History: Received February 1, 1991; Accepted June 7, 1991

This study compares the temporal resolution of frequency-modulated sinusoids by normal-hearing and hearing-impaired subjects in a discrimination task. One signal increased linearly by 200 Hz in 50 msec. The other was identical except that its trajectory followed a series of discrete steps. Center frequencies were 500, 1000, 2000, and 4000 Hz. As the number of steps was increased, the duration of the individual steps decreased, and the subjects’ discrimination performance monotonically decreased to chance. It was hypothesized that the listeners could not temporally resolve the trajectory of the step signals at short step durations. At equal sensation levels, and at equal sound pressure levels, temporal resolution was significantly reduced for the impaired subjects. The difference between groups was smaller in the equal sound pressure level condition. Performance was much poorer at 4000 Hz than at the other test frequencies in all conditions because of poorer frequency discrimination at that frequency.

Acknowledgments
The authors wish to thank Dr. Ying-Yong Qi and Chien-Yeh Hsu for their programming assistance, and Mary Neill for her help in data collection. They also wish to express their appreciation to Peter J. Fitzgibbons, C. Formby, and Richard H. Wilson for their helpful comments.
This research was sponsored by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, Air Force Systems Command, USAF, under Grant AFOSR-89–0227. The U.S. Government is authorized to reproduce and distribute reprints for government purposes notwithstanding any copyright notation thereon.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access