Preparing for Communication Interactions The Value of Anticipatory Strategies for Adults With Hearing Impairment Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 1992
Preparing for Communication Interactions
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Nancy
    University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics Iowa City
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Hearing Disorders / Audiologic / Aural Rehabilitation / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 1992
Preparing for Communication Interactions
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1992, Vol. 35, 430-435. doi:10.1044/jshr.3502.430
History: Received February 15, 1991 , Accepted July 1, 1991
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1992, Vol. 35, 430-435. doi:10.1044/jshr.3502.430
History: Received February 15, 1991; Accepted July 1, 1991

Some people with hearing impairment may use anticipatory strategies to prepare for an upcoming communication interaction, such as a doctor’s appointment. They may consider vocabulary and statements that might occur, and they may practice speechreading a partner saying the items. Experiment 1 evaluated the effectiveness of two types of anticipatory strategies: workbook activities and situation-specific lipreading practice. Two groups of normalhearing subjects were asked to prepare for a communication interaction in a bank setting where they would be required to recognize speech using only the visual signal. Each group was assigned to one type of anticipatory strategy. A third group served as a control group. Experiment 2 evaluated whether multifaceted anticipatory practice improved cochlear implant users’ ability to recognize statements and words audiovisually that might occur in a doctor’s office, bank, movie theater, and gas station. One group of implanted subjects received 4 days of training, 1 day for each setting, and a second group served as a control group. In both experiments, subjects who used anticipatory strategies did not improve their performance on situation-specific sentence tests more than the control subjects.

Supported in part by National Institutes of Health grant DC00242; grant RR59 from the General Clinical Research Centers Program, Division of Research Resources, NIH; and a grant from Lions Clubs of Iowa. I thank Gretchen Burns, Heidi Nass, and Tracy Tremel for their assistance in data collection.
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