Cochlear Implants in Children, Adolescents, and Prelinguistically Deafened Adults Speech Perception Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 1992
Cochlear Implants in Children, Adolescents, and Prelinguistically Deafened Adults
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Pam W. Dawson
    Department of Otolaryngology University of Melbourne, and The Cochlear Implant Clinic The Royal Victorian Eye and Ear Hospital East Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
  • Peter J. Blamey
    Department of Otolaryngology University of Melbourne, and The Cochlear Implant Clinic The Royal Victorian Eye and Ear Hospital East Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
  • Louise C. Rowland
    Department of Otolaryngology University of Melbourne, and The Cochlear Implant Clinic The Royal Victorian Eye and Ear Hospital East Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
  • Shani J. Dettman
    Department of Otolaryngology University of Melbourne, and The Cochlear Implant Clinic The Royal Victorian Eye and Ear Hospital East Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
  • Graeme M. Clark
    Department of Otolaryngology University of Melbourne, and The Cochlear Implant Clinic The Royal Victorian Eye and Ear Hospital East Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
  • Peter A. Busby
    Department of Otolaryngology University of Melbourne, and The Cochlear Implant Clinic The Royal Victorian Eye and Ear Hospital East Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
  • Alison M. Brown
    Department of Otolaryngology University of Melbourne, and The Cochlear Implant Clinic The Royal Victorian Eye and Ear Hospital East Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
  • Richard C. Dowell
    Department of Otolaryngology University of Melbourne, and The Cochlear Implant Clinic The Royal Victorian Eye and Ear Hospital East Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
  • Field W. Rickards
    Department of Otolaryngology University of Melbourne, and The Cochlear Implant Clinic The Royal Victorian Eye and Ear Hospital East Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
  • Currently affiliated with the Australian Bionic Ear & Hearing Research Institute, East Melbourne, Victoria.
    Currently affiliated with the Australian Bionic Ear & Hearing Research Institute, East Melbourne, Victoria.×
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Hearing Disorders / Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Audiologic / Aural Rehabilitation / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 1992
Cochlear Implants in Children, Adolescents, and Prelinguistically Deafened Adults
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1992, Vol. 35, 401-417. doi:10.1044/jshr.3502.401
History: Received August 13, 1990 , Accepted April 19, 1991
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1992, Vol. 35, 401-417. doi:10.1044/jshr.3502.401
History: Received August 13, 1990; Accepted April 19, 1991

A group of 10 children, adolescents, and prelinguistically deafened adults were implanted with the 22-electrode cochlear implant (Cochlear Pty Ltd) at the University of Melbourne Cochlear Implant Clinic and have used the prosthesis for periods from 12 to 65 months. Postoperative performance on the majority of closed-set speech perception tests was significantly greater than chance, and significantly better than preoperative performance for all of the patients. Five of the children have achieved substantial scores on open-set speech tests using hearing without lipreading. Phoneme scores in monosyllabic words ranged from 30% to 72%; word scores in sentences ranged from 26% to 74%. Four of these 5 children were implanted during preadolescence (aged 5:5 to 10:2 years) and the fifth, who had a progressive loss, was implanted during adolescence (aged 14:8 years). The duration of profound deafness before implantation varied from 2 to 8 years. Improvements were also noted over postoperative data collection times for the younger children. The remaining 5 patients who did not demonstrate open-set recognition were implanted after a longer duration of profound deafness (aged 13:11 to 20:1 years). The results are discussed with reference to variables that may affect implant performance, such as age at onset of loss, duration of profound loss, age at implantation, and duration of implantation. They are compared with results for similar groups of children using hearing aids and cochlear implants.

Acknowledgments
The authors gratefully acknowledge the financial support of the Lions International Deafness Research Fellowship, the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia, Channel 10 Deafness Appeal, and the Deafness Foundation of Australia. They would also like to thank the parents of the children involved and the teachers at Glendonald School for Deaf Children in Kew, St. Mary’s School for Children with Impaired Hearing in Wantirna South, and the Westbourne Grammar School, Sayers Rd., Werribee, for their support and cooperation.
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