Cohesion Repairs in the Narratives of Normal-Language and Language-Disordered School-Age Children The self-initiated repairs produced by 14 normal-language and 14 language-disordered children during a story retelling task are described. When grammatical repairs and repairs to text meaning were analysed, no group differences were found for either repair type. Both groups initiated significantly more repairs to text meaning. When repairs to text ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 1992
Cohesion Repairs in the Narratives of Normal-Language and Language-Disordered School-Age Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Sherry L. Purcell
    University of Connecticut, Storrs
  • Betty Z. Liles
    University of Connecticut, Storrs
Article Information
Language Disorders / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 1992
Cohesion Repairs in the Narratives of Normal-Language and Language-Disordered School-Age Children
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1992, Vol. 35, 354-362. doi:10.1044/jshr.3502.354
History: Received September 6, 1990 , Accepted June 13, 1991
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1992, Vol. 35, 354-362. doi:10.1044/jshr.3502.354
History: Received September 6, 1990; Accepted June 13, 1991

The self-initiated repairs produced by 14 normal-language and 14 language-disordered children during a story retelling task are described. When grammatical repairs and repairs to text meaning were analysed, no group differences were found for either repair type. Both groups initiated significantly more repairs to text meaning. When repairs to text meaning were probed for the cohesive aspects of the repair activity, there were no group differences for the frequency or the types of cohesive repairs that were initiated. However, differences were significant for the success of the cohesive repair attempts and for the location of the repairs. Normal-language and language-disordered children appear to share similar strategies for monitoring narrative discourse, but they differ in their abilities to actualize their monitoring attention.

Acknowledgments
We wish to express our gratitude to the speech-language pathologists, staff members, and students in the Culver City Unified School District, Culver City, California, for their cooperation and willingness to participate in this project. We are also grateful for the contribution of our assistant, Judy Bell, a psychology student at Loyola Mary-mount University. Her level of professionalism added greatly to the successful completion of our study.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access