Articulation, Language, Rate, and Fluency Characteristics of Stuttering and Nonstuttering Preschool Children Articulation (Arizona Articulation Proficiency Scale), language (TOLD, Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test), and fluency (Fluency Interview) tests were given to 20 stuttering and 20 nonstuttering male and female preschool children to examine potential performance differences between the two groups. Speaking rate was also measured. There were several significant but minor differences ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 1992
Articulation, Language, Rate, and Fluency Characteristics of Stuttering and Nonstuttering Preschool Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Bruce P. Ryan
    Communicative Disorders Department California State University Long Beach
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 1992
Articulation, Language, Rate, and Fluency Characteristics of Stuttering and Nonstuttering Preschool Children
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1992, Vol. 35, 333-342. doi:10.1044/jshr.3502.333
History: Received January 8, 1991 , Accepted July 23, 1991
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1992, Vol. 35, 333-342. doi:10.1044/jshr.3502.333
History: Received January 8, 1991; Accepted July 23, 1991

Articulation (Arizona Articulation Proficiency Scale), language (TOLD, Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test), and fluency (Fluency Interview) tests were given to 20 stuttering and 20 nonstuttering male and female preschool children to examine potential performance differences between the two groups. Speaking rate was also measured. There were several significant but minor differences between the two groups. The stuttering children scored lower on seven out of eight language measures than the nonstuttering children and slightly lower than the average score for their age group when compared with the tests’ normative samples. Girls demonstrated higher language scores and faster speaking rates. There were no differences between the stuttering and nonstuttering groups on articulation proficiency, although 25% of the stuttering group (all boys) later required articulation treatment. There were few statistically significant correlations between measures of stuttering rate, speaking rate, and language performances within each of the two groups of children, although there were consistent, low-to-moderate negative correlations between stuttering rate and language measures and low positive correlations between speaking rate and language measures. A stepwise regression analysis suggested that selected variables of language proficiency combined with speaking rate were at best moderately predictive (R=.52) of stuttering behavior for the total group of children.

Acknowledgments
The author wishes to acknowledge the students of CSULB, especially Cheryl Marsh and Karen Allen (long-term graduate students), for their contribution to the testing, scoring, and first-order analysis of the data. Also deserving of thanks is Walter H. Moore, Jr., for his consultation and help with the statistical analysis of the data, as well as David Bradley and Stafford Cox of the CSULB Academic Computing Center. Further gratitude is owed the Joe and Emily Lowe Foundation and the University Research Committee of California State University, Long Beach, for their support of the project.
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