Speech Naturalness and Prolonged-Speech Treatments for Stuttering Further Variables and Data Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 1992
Speech Naturalness and Prolonged-Speech Treatments for Stuttering
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Mark Onslow
    School of Communication Disorders The University of Sydney Sydney, Australia
  • Brett Hayes
    School of Communication Disorders The University of Sydney Sydney, Australia
  • Leanne Hutchins
    Special Education Support Centre Sydney, Australia
  • Denis Newman
    Department of Speech and Hearing The University of Queensland Brisbane, Australia
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 1992
Speech Naturalness and Prolonged-Speech Treatments for Stuttering
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1992, Vol. 35, 274-282. doi:10.1044/jshr.3502.274
History: Received October 8, 1990 , Accepted August 5, 1991
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1992, Vol. 35, 274-282. doi:10.1044/jshr.3502.274
History: Received October 8, 1990; Accepted August 5, 1991

It is well known that unusual speech quality may result from stuttering treatments that are based on prolonged speech. However, empirical information concerning the speech quality associated with those treatments is lacking. The present study was designed to contribute such empirical information. Results indicated that speech quality assessments of posttreatment clients, using Martin, Haroldson, and Triden's (1984)  speech naturalness scale, gave similar results regardless of whether they were based on monologues or conversations. The speech quality of those clients remained stable at the conclusion of their treatment program. Further, there was a significant, positive correlation between pretreatment speech measures and measures of speech naturalness made after the establishment of stutter-free speech. The subjects whose pretreatment stuttering was the most severe had posttreatment speech naturalness scores that were more than two scale values worse than the subjects whose pretreatment stuttering was the least severe. Speech naturalness scale scores are presented for nonstutterers and posttreatment stutterers and these data are compared with existing findings.

Acknowledgments
The authors acknowledge their appreciation to Elisabeth Harrison, Michelle Lincoln, Ann Packman, Joan Rosenthal, Christine Sheard, and Linda Hand for assistance during various stages of the studies reported here. We are indebted to Barry Guitar, Richard Curlee, and Martin Adams for their careful critiquing of an earlier version of this manuscript and for their editorial input.
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