Articulation Testing Versus Conversational Speech Sampling Detailed speech analyses were performed on data from 61 speech-delayed children assessed by both a standard articulation test and a conversational speech sample. Statistically significant differences between the articulation accuracy profiles obtained from the two sampling modes were observed at all linguistic levels examined, including overall accuracy, phonological processes, individual ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 1992
Articulation Testing Versus Conversational Speech Sampling
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Judith A. Morrison
    University of Redlands Redlands, CA
  • Lawrence D. Shriberg
    University of Wisconsin-Madison
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 1992
Articulation Testing Versus Conversational Speech Sampling
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1992, Vol. 35, 259-273. doi:10.1044/jshr.3502.259
History: Received January 31, 1991 , Accepted July 29, 1991
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1992, Vol. 35, 259-273. doi:10.1044/jshr.3502.259
History: Received January 31, 1991; Accepted July 29, 1991

Detailed speech analyses were performed on data from 61 speech-delayed children assessed by both a standard articulation test and a conversational speech sample. Statistically significant differences between the articulation accuracy profiles obtained from the two sampling modes were observed at all linguistic levels examined, including overall accuracy, phonological processes, individual phonemes, manner features, error-type, word position, and allophones. Established sounds were often produced more accurately in conversational speech, whereas emerging sounds were often produced more accurately in response to articulation test stimuli. Error patterns involving word-to-word transitions were available only in the context of continuous speech. A pass-fail analysis indicated that the average subject would receive similar clinical decisions from articulation testing and conversational speech sampling on an average of 71% of consonant sounds. Analyses of demographic, language, and speech variables did not yield any subject characteristics that were significantly associated with concordance rates in the two sampling modes. Discussion considers sources of variance for differences between sampling modes, including processes associated with both the speaker and the transcriber. In comparison to the validity of conversational speech samples for integrated speech, language, and prosodic analyses, articulation tests appear to yield neither typical nor optimal measures of speech performance.

Acknowledgments
We express our sincere thanks to a number of persons who provided competent research and editorial assistance at different stages of this work: Barri Babow, Maria Cavicchio, Patricia Engebose, Frederic Gruber, Rebecca Hinke, Sara Hoffman, Gregory Lof, Jane Loncke, Amparo Ortiz, Carmen Rasmussen, Dorothy Rorick, Catherine Trost-Steffen, and Carol Widder. We also acknowledge the continuing support of the Madison Metropolitan School District, Integrated Student Services, with special thanks to Beth Daggett and Susan Albert. This work was supported by grants from the United States Department of Education, G008400633 and the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communicative Disorders, DC00496.
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