Validation of a Modern Miniature Transducer for Measurement of Interlabial Contact Pressure During Speech The response characteristics of the Entran Flatline pressure transducer (EPL-2001-10)TM and its potential for use in studies of speech production were investigated. Data from a model simulating bilabial closure and from 2 human subjects indicate that this transducer is an appropriate tool for measurement of interlabial pressure during production of ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 1992
Validation of a Modern Miniature Transducer for Measurement of Interlabial Contact Pressure During Speech
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Virginia A. Hinton
    Department of Communication Disorders and Sciences Southern Illinois University at Carbondale
  • Erich S. Luschei
    Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology University of Iowa, Iowa City
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 1992
Validation of a Modern Miniature Transducer for Measurement of Interlabial Contact Pressure During Speech
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1992, Vol. 35, 245-251. doi:10.1044/jshr.3502.245
History: Received September 21, 1990 , Accepted April 18, 1991
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1992, Vol. 35, 245-251. doi:10.1044/jshr.3502.245
History: Received September 21, 1990; Accepted April 18, 1991

The response characteristics of the Entran Flatline pressure transducer (EPL-2001-10)TM and its potential for use in studies of speech production were investigated. Data from a model simulating bilabial closure and from 2 human subjects indicate that this transducer is an appropriate tool for measurement of interlabial pressure during production of bilabial consonants. That is, the onset of the pressure pulse corresponds to the initiation of lip contact between the upper and lower lips, and the return to baseline represents complete lip separation, thus eliminating the need to infer lip contact from records of lip movement. Transducer output is not influenced significantly by temperature fluctuations or changes in the configuration and stiffness of the lips. The frequency response and level of sensitivity are linear over the range of pressures produced during speech. The subjects in this study typically generated interlabial pressures of 1.0–3.0 kPa during production of [p] in a carrier phrase.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by PHS research grants DE–06943 and CD–00085–23 from the National Institutes of Health. We thank Kelly Cole, John Folkins, Jerry Moon, Don Robin, and Patricia Zebrowski for their comments on a preliminary version of this manuscript.
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