Comments on "Acoustic Measurements of Men’s and Women’s Voices: A Study of Context Effects and Covariatlon" The purpose of this letter is to comment on only one minor aspect of the Nittrouer, McGowen, Milenkovic, and Beehler (1990)  article dealing with the effects of speaker sex, time of day, consonantal context, and vowel identity on various acoustic measures of men’s and women’s voices. We believe that ... Letter to the Editor
Letter to the Editor  |   February 01, 1992
Comments on "Acoustic Measurements of Men’s and Women’s Voices: A Study of Context Effects and Covariatlon"
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kathryn L. Garrett
    University of Nebraska-Lincoln
  • E. Charles Healey
    University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Letters to the Editor
Letter to the Editor   |   February 01, 1992
Comments on "Acoustic Measurements of Men’s and Women’s Voices: A Study of Context Effects and Covariatlon"
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1992, Vol. 35, 96. doi:10.1044/jshr.3501.96a
History: Received February 15, 1991 , Accepted March 12, 1991
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1992, Vol. 35, 96. doi:10.1044/jshr.3501.96a
History: Received February 15, 1991; Accepted March 12, 1991
The purpose of this letter is to comment on only one minor aspect of the Nittrouer, McGowen, Milenkovic, and Beehler (1990)  article dealing with the effects of speaker sex, time of day, consonantal context, and vowel identity on various acoustic measures of men’s and women’s voices. We believe that the paper provides a valuable and comprehensive analysis of adult vocal behavior under a variety of conditions. However, we wish to comment on the authors’ conclusions regarding the “time of day” data. In their discussion, they state that laryngeal activity is not affected by the time of day in which the measures are taken, and that finding “should be welcome news to speech clinicians who need to evaluate patients with vocal pathologies, and have constraints on scheduling” (p. 771). We believe that additional research on the extent of individual variation in both normal voices and patients with voice disorders is needed before recommendations are made about when to measure vocal parameters in a clinical setting.
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