Acoustic Integrity of Speech Production in Children With Moderate and Severe Hearing Impairment Ten normally hearing and 10 age-matched subjects with moderate-to-severe hearing impairment were recorded producing a protocol of 18 basic syllables [/pi/,/pa/,/pu/; /bi/,/ba/,/bu/; /ti/,/ta/,/tu/; /di/,/da/,/du/; /ki/,/ka/,/ku/; /gi/,/ga/,/gu/] repeated five times. The resulting 90 syllables were digitized and measured for (a) total duration; (b) voice-onset time (VOT) of the initial consonant; (c) ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 1992
Acoustic Integrity of Speech Production in Children With Moderate and Severe Hearing Impairment
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • John Ryalls
    Ecole d’orthophonie et d’audiologie Université de Montréal, Québec
  • Annie Larouche
    Ecole d’orthophonie et d’audiologie Université de Montréal, Québec
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 1992
Acoustic Integrity of Speech Production in Children With Moderate and Severe Hearing Impairment
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1992, Vol. 35, 88-95. doi:10.1044/jshr.3501.88
History: Received May 7, 1990 , Accepted April 19, 1991
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1992, Vol. 35, 88-95. doi:10.1044/jshr.3501.88
History: Received May 7, 1990; Accepted April 19, 1991

Ten normally hearing and 10 age-matched subjects with moderate-to-severe hearing impairment were recorded producing a protocol of 18 basic syllables [/pi/,/pa/,/pu/; /bi/,/ba/,/bu/; /ti/,/ta/,/tu/; /di/,/da/,/du/; /ki/,/ka/,/ku/; /gi/,/ga/,/gu/] repeated five times. The resulting 90 syllables were digitized and measured for (a) total duration; (b) voice-onset time (VOT) of the initial consonant; (c) fundamental frequency (F0) at midpoint of vowel; and (d) formant frequencies (F1, F2, F3), also measured at midpoint of vowel. Statistical comparisons were conducted on (a) average values for each syllable, and (b) standard deviations. Although there were numerical differences between normally hearing and hearing-impaired groups, few differences were statistically significant.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by a grant from the Voice Foundation for Hearing‐Impaired Children of Ontario, by Fonds de la Recherche en Santé du Québec and by an equipment grant from the Comité d'Attribution de Fonds Internes de Recherche of the Université de Montréal. We would like to thank Gilles Masson for technical support, François Dehaut for statistical consultation, and the children who participated in this study as well as the speech‐language pathologists who arranged for their participation.
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