Articulatory Function After Resection of the Tongue and Floor of the Mouth Palatometric and Perceptual Evaluation Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 1992
Articulatory Function After Resection of the Tongue and Floor of the Mouth
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Satoko Imai
    First Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery School of Dentistry, Showa University Tokyo, Japan
  • Ken-ichi Michi
    First Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery School of Dentistry, Showa University Tokyo, Japan
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 1992
Articulatory Function After Resection of the Tongue and Floor of the Mouth
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1992, Vol. 35, 68-78. doi:10.1044/jshr.3501.68
History: Received May 3, 1990 , Accepted July 2, 1991
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1992, Vol. 35, 68-78. doi:10.1044/jshr.3501.68
History: Received May 3, 1990; Accepted July 2, 1991

Linguapalatal contact patterns and the time course of changes in contacts during utterances of /asa, ata, a∫a, aça/ were measured using electropalatography (EPG). The relations between these data and perceptual scores in 17 glossectomized patients after various surgical methods were examined. The linguapalatal contact patterns produced during perceptually less distorted sounds varied with the place and manner of articulation. Patterns having very few contacts or a posterior groove produced more distorted /s/ sounds; however, types of EPG patterns producing less distorted /s/ sounds were relatively frequent. Distortion of the /∫/ and /ç/ sounds was less often produced by variation of the EPG patterns, whereas /t/ sounds were most frequently judged to be highly distorted. Patterns that showed complete constriction along the dental arch or constriction on the anterior portion of the hard palate, as well as rapid release for plosion by the tongue tip, produced less distorted /t/ sounds. The results revealed that glossectomized patients often evidenced defective stop sounds. It was concluded that mobility rather than volume of the residual tongue is required to produce less distorted stops.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported in part by the Ministry of Education, Science and Culture of Japan (Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research, 60480438). Special thanks is offered to Y. Tashiro for his valuable statistical consultation and to N. Suzuki for her comments on early stage of this investigation. The authors wish to thank the reviewers and Bruce R. Gerratt, associate editor, for their very helpful comments and suggestions. Sincere appreciation is also extended to Albert Simpson and Suzanne Knowlton for their help in preparing the English manuscript. We are grateful to Y. Yamashita and C. Matsuda who kindly volunteered their time to serve as the judges for the perceptual evaluation.
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