Cross-Cultural Attitudes Toward Speech Disorders Speech‐language pathologists serving multicultural populations may encounter unfamiliar beliefs about speech disorders among the members of different cultures. This study used a questionnaire to look at attitudes toward four disorders (cleft palate, dysfluency, hearing impairment, and misarticulations) among 166 university students representing English-speaking North American culture and several other cultures ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 1992
Cross-Cultural Attitudes Toward Speech Disorders
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Linda Bebout
    Department of English University of Windsor, Ontario
  • Bradford Arthur
    Department of English San Francisco State University
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Hearing Disorders / Special Populations / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Genetic & Congenital Disorders / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 1992
Cross-Cultural Attitudes Toward Speech Disorders
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1992, Vol. 35, 45-52. doi:10.1044/jshr.3501.45
History: Received January 28, 1991 , Accepted March 20, 1991
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1992, Vol. 35, 45-52. doi:10.1044/jshr.3501.45
History: Received January 28, 1991; Accepted March 20, 1991

Speech‐language pathologists serving multicultural populations may encounter unfamiliar beliefs about speech disorders among the members of different cultures. This study used a questionnaire to look at attitudes toward four disorders (cleft palate, dysfluency, hearing impairment, and misarticulations) among 166 university students representing English-speaking North American culture and several other cultures (e.g., Chinese, Southeast Asian, Hispanic). The results showed significant group differences on items involving the subjects’ beliefs about the emotional health of persons with speech disorders and about the potential ability of speech-disordered persons to change their own speech.

Acknowledgments
This research was presented at the 1989 convention of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association in St. Louis, MO.
We are grateful to Colleen Cassano at the University of Windsor, Ontario, and to the participating ESL instructors in the English Department at San Francisco State University and at the American Language Institute in San Francisco for assistance in distributing the questionnaires. We would also like to thank Tim Shively for assistance with data entry and Minnie Graham of San Francisco State University and three anonymous reviewers for providing useful comments on the manuscript.
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