Articulation Rate in 3- and 5-Year-Old Children The major purposes of this study were to provide normative data on articulation rate in preschool children and to examine the influence on articulation rate of age, gender, context, and utterance length. The subjects were twenty 3-year-old children and twenty 5-year-old children, equally balanced for gender. Durational measures of utterances ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 1992
Articulation Rate in 3- and 5-Year-Old Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jean F. Walker
    University of Toronto
  • Lisa M. D. Archibald
    Scarborough Grace Hospital Scarborough, Ontario
  • Sharon R. Cherniak
    Peel Memorial Hospital Brampton, Ontario
  • Valerie G. Fish
    Riverdale Hospital Toronto, Ontario
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 1992
Articulation Rate in 3- and 5-Year-Old Children
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1992, Vol. 35, 4-13. doi:10.1044/jshr.3501.04
History: Received March 13, 1990 , Accepted January 18, 1991
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1992, Vol. 35, 4-13. doi:10.1044/jshr.3501.04
History: Received March 13, 1990; Accepted January 18, 1991

The major purposes of this study were to provide normative data on articulation rate in preschool children and to examine the influence on articulation rate of age, gender, context, and utterance length. The subjects were twenty 3-year-old children and twenty 5-year-old children, equally balanced for gender. Durational measures of utterances were analyzed in syllables and phones per second in both spontaneous and imitated speech contexts. The articulation rate of the 5-year-old subjects was significantly faster than that of the 3-year-olds. Spontaneous speech was significantly faster and more variable than imitated speech. Some gender differences were found. Measures in syllables per second and phones per second, although not always yielding identical results, were found to be highly correlated.

Acknowledgments
We are most grateful for the generous advice and assistance of Dr. Michael McClean with respect to the acoustical measurement and analysis and for his helpful comments on drafts of this manuscript. We also gratefully acknowledge the counsel of Dr. Hyla Rubin on Issues pertaining to child language development. Thanks are also extended to Dr. Martyn Hyde for advice on the statistical analysis and on revisions to the manuscript. Finally, we would like to thank the reviewers for their very helpful comments and suggestions.
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