Effects of Aging on Time-Gated Isolated Word-Recognition Performance This investigation was designed to study real-time isolated monosyllabic word-recognition performance and the feasibility of applying time-gated NU-6 word-recognition test materials for real-time assessment of older listeners. Methods and materials developed in a previous investigation were used to obtain time-gated performance measures from 37 older listeners (mean age=69 years). The ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 1992
Effects of Aging on Time-Gated Isolated Word-Recognition Performance
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Chie H. Craig
    University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 1992
Effects of Aging on Time-Gated Isolated Word-Recognition Performance
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1992, Vol. 35, 234-238. doi:10.1044/jshr.3501.234
History: Received March 5, 1991 , Accepted June 14, 1991
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1992, Vol. 35, 234-238. doi:10.1044/jshr.3501.234
History: Received March 5, 1991; Accepted June 14, 1991

This investigation was designed to study real-time isolated monosyllabic word-recognition performance and the feasibility of applying time-gated NU-6 word-recognition test materials for real-time assessment of older listeners. Methods and materials developed in a previous investigation were used to obtain time-gated performance measures from 37 older listeners (mean age=69 years). The older listener performance measures were compared with extant data from 20 normally hearing young adult listeners (mean age=22 years). Specifically, listener confidence and accuracy by gate as well as listener isolation point, confidence at the isolation point, and total acceptance point measures were evaluated. The results show that major events in the real-time understanding process occur at a slower pace among older listeners. The data indicate that the time-gating method has excellent potential for future research among elderly listeners.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported in part by the Graduate School of the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee through a Graduate Research Committee Award and by the National Institutes of Health (NINCDS) through an Academic Research Enhancement Award (HAR 1 R15 NS26017-01) and a Clinical Investigator Development Award (1 K08 DC00003-01). In addition, the author would like to acknowledge Emily Roos, Alisa Suttner, and Cheryl Hirl for their project assistance and Darryl Craig for his contributions to the data tabulation and statistical analyses.
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