The Late Auditory Evoked Potential Masking-Level Difference as a Function of Noise Level The purpose of this study was to determine whether the masking-level difference (MLD) obtained with the late (P2) auditory evoked potentials has characteristics similar to those reported for the behavioral MLD with respect to the effects of noise level. Psychoacoustic studies have shown that the magnitude of the MLD increases ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 1992
The Late Auditory Evoked Potential Masking-Level Difference as a Function of Noise Level
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Cynthia G. Fowler
    Veterans Administration Medical Center Long Beach, CA, and University of California, Irvine
  • Charlene M. Mikami
    Veterans Administration Medical Center Long Beach, CA, and University of California, Irvine
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Hearing Disorders / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 1992
The Late Auditory Evoked Potential Masking-Level Difference as a Function of Noise Level
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1992, Vol. 35, 216-221. doi:10.1044/jshr.3501.216
History: Received April 1, 1991 , Accepted June 21, 1991
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1992, Vol. 35, 216-221. doi:10.1044/jshr.3501.216
History: Received April 1, 1991; Accepted June 21, 1991

The purpose of this study was to determine whether the masking-level difference (MLD) obtained with the late (P2) auditory evoked potentials has characteristics similar to those reported for the behavioral MLD with respect to the effects of noise level. Psychoacoustic studies have shown that the magnitude of the MLD increases as a function of the noise level. In the present study, P2 thresholds were measured in SoNo (signals and noise in phase at the ears) and SπNo (signals out of phase and noise in phase at the ears) conditions for noise levels of 0–60 dB pressure spectrum level (Lps). Subjects were 5 normal-hearing young adults. The difference in SoNo and SπNo thresholds, or the MLD, increased linearly as the noise levels increased through 60 dB Lps, whereas the behavioral MLD magnitude is reported to saturate at high noise levels. These results suggest that the late-potential MLD reflects characteristics similar to, but not identical with, those of the behavioral MLD.

Acknowledgments
Support for this project was provided by the Medical Research Service of the Department of Veterans Affairs, Washington, DC. The authors wish to thank Richard Wilson for comments on the manuscript. Portions of this paper were presented at the 1989 Convention of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access