Speech Perception in Adult Subjects With Familial Dyslexia Speech perception was investigated in a carefully selected group of adult subjects with familial dyslexia. Perception of three synthetic speech continua was studied: /a/-//, in which steady-state spectral cues distinguished the vowel stimuli; /ba/-/da/, in which rapidly changing spectral cues were varied; and /sta/-/sa/, in which a temporal cue, silence ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 1992
Speech Perception in Adult Subjects With Familial Dyslexia
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Michele L. Steffens
    Department of Psychology and Mailman Center for Child Development University of Miami, FL, and Department of Pediatrics Genetics Division University of Miami Medical School Miami, FL
  • Rebecca E. Eilers
    Department of Psychology and Mailman Center for Child Development University of Miami, FL, and Department of Pediatrics Genetics Division University of Miami Medical School Miami, FL
  • Karen Gross-Glenn
    Department of Psychology and Mailman Center for Child Development University of Miami, FL, and Department of Pediatrics Genetics Division University of Miami Medical School Miami, FL
  • Bonnie Jallad
    Department of Psychology and Mailman Center for Child Development University of Miami, FL, and Department of Pediatrics Genetics Division University of Miami Medical School Miami, FL
Article Information
Language Disorders / Reading & Writing Disorders / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 1992
Speech Perception in Adult Subjects With Familial Dyslexia
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1992, Vol. 35, 192-200. doi:10.1044/jshr.3501.192
History: Received August 27, 1990 , Accepted April 26, 1991
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1992, Vol. 35, 192-200. doi:10.1044/jshr.3501.192
History: Received August 27, 1990; Accepted April 26, 1991

Speech perception was investigated in a carefully selected group of adult subjects with familial dyslexia. Perception of three synthetic speech continua was studied: /a/-//, in which steady-state spectral cues distinguished the vowel stimuli; /ba/-/da/, in which rapidly changing spectral cues were varied; and /sta/-/sa/, in which a temporal cue, silence duration, was systematically varied. These three continua, which differed with respect to the nature of the acoustic cues discriminating between pairs, were used to assess subjects’ abilities to use steady state, dynamic, and temporal cues. Dyslexic and normal readers participated in one identification and two discrimination tasks for each continuum. Results suggest that dyslexic readers required greater silence duration than normal readers to shift their perception from /sa/ to /sta/. In addition, although the dyslexic subjects were able to label and discriminate the synthetic speech continua, they did not necessarily use the acoustic cues in the same manner as normal readers, and their overall performance was generally less accurate.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by NIH grant # 1 P01 HD 21885–04 to Herbert A. Lubs. The authors wish to thank Cheryl Brown, Alex Kushch, Michael P. Lynch, Debra Moroff, D. Kimbrough Oiler, and Roberta Turner for their assistance. Karen Gross-Glenn died January 7, 1991.
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