Auditory Distortion Products Measured With Averaged Auditory Evoked Potentials The purpose of this investigation was to describe the properties of averaged auditory evoked potential distortion products (AEP-DPs) in guinea pigs. This study provided a step toward developing a clinical index of nonlinear processing of auditory signals and supplied a baseline for studies evaluating the effect of cochlear damage on ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 1992
Auditory Distortion Products Measured With Averaged Auditory Evoked Potentials
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Mark E. Chertoff
    University of Wisconsin, Madison
  • Kurt E. Hecox
    University of Wisconsin, Madison and Nicolet Instrument Corp. Madison, WI
  • Robert Goldstein
    University of Wisconsin, Madison
  • Currently affiliated with The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD.
    Currently affiliated with The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD.×
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 1992
Auditory Distortion Products Measured With Averaged Auditory Evoked Potentials
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1992, Vol. 35, 157-166. doi:10.1044/jshr.3501.157
History: Received December 21, 1990 , Accepted April 12, 1991
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1992, Vol. 35, 157-166. doi:10.1044/jshr.3501.157
History: Received December 21, 1990; Accepted April 12, 1991

The purpose of this investigation was to describe the properties of averaged auditory evoked potential distortion products (AEP-DPs) in guinea pigs. This study provided a step toward developing a clinical index of nonlinear processing of auditory signals and supplied a baseline for studies evaluating the effect of cochlear damage on AEP-DPs.

The amplitude of the AEP-DPs was evaluated as a function of f2/fl ratio (1.12–1.52) and primary frequency (500 Hz–2000 Hz). The amplitude of the AEP cubic difference tone (AEP-CDT) increased with increasing f2/fl ratio for the 500-Hz f1 primary and remained constant for the 800-Hz and 1700-Hz f1 primaries. The AEP-CDT generated by the 1100-Hz and 1400 Hz f1 primaries was maximum for the middle f2/fl ratios (1.22, 1.32, and 1.42). The AEP-CDT could not be distinguished from the noise floor for the 2000-Hz f1 primary. The AEP difference tone (AEP-DT) was larger and more frequently identified than the AEP-CDT. The amplitude of the AEP-DT decreased with an increase in f2/f1 ratio. The decrease was more pronounced for low-frequency f1 primaries than for high-frequency f1 primaries.

Acknowledgments
This paper is based on Mark Chertoff’s doctoral dissertation at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. The authors thank Robert Lutfi, Terry Wiley, and Michael Chial for their guidance and criticism. This work was supported by grant #R01 NS16436 from the NIH.
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