Echolalic Responses by a Child With Autism to Four Experimental Conditions of Sociolinguistic Input Studies of the immediate verbal imitations (IVIs) of subjects with echolalia report that features of linguistic or social input alone affect the number of IVIs elicited. This experimental study of a child with echolalia and autism controlled each of these variables while introducing a systematic change in the other. The ... Language: Articles and Reports
Language: Articles and Reports  |   February 01, 1992
Echolalic Responses by a Child With Autism to Four Experimental Conditions of Sociolinguistic Input
 
Author Notes
Article Information
Special Populations / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Autism Spectrum
Language: Articles and Reports   |   February 01, 1992
Echolalic Responses by a Child With Autism to Four Experimental Conditions of Sociolinguistic Input
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1992, Vol. 35, 139-147. doi:10.1044/jshr.3501.139
History: Received January 29, 1991 , Accepted July 1, 1991
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1992, Vol. 35, 139-147. doi:10.1044/jshr.3501.139
History: Received January 29, 1991; Accepted July 1, 1991

Studies of the immediate verbal imitations (IVIs) of subjects with echolalia report that features of linguistic or social input alone affect the number of IVIs elicited. This experimental study of a child with echolalia and autism controlled each of these variables while introducing a systematic change in the other. The subject produced more (p<.05) IVIs in response to unknown lexical words presented with a high degree of directiveness (Condition D) than in response to three other conditions of stimulus presentation (e.g., unknown lexical words, minimally directive style.) Thus, an interaction between the effects of linguistic and social input was demonstrated. IVIs were produced across all conditions, primarily during first presentations of lexical stimuli. Only the IVIs elicited by first presentations of the lexical stimuli during Condition D differed significantly (p<.05) from the number of IVIs elicited by first presentations of lexical stimuli in other conditions. These findings viewed together suggest that the occurrence of IVIs was related, at least for this child, to an uncertain or informative event and that this response was significantly greater when the lexical stimuli were unknown and presented in a highly directive style.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access