Simplified Derivation of Auditory Filter Shapes In a recent paper Formby (1990)  described a simplified method for deriving the shape of the auditory filter from data obtained by measuring the threshold for a sinusoidal signal as a function of the cut-off frequency of a low-pass or high-pass noise masker. In common with other researchers in this ... Letter to the Editor
Letter to the Editor  |   December 01, 1991
Simplified Derivation of Auditory Filter Shapes
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Brian C. J. Moore
    Cambridge University
Article Information
Hearing / Letters to the Editor
Letter to the Editor   |   December 01, 1991
Simplified Derivation of Auditory Filter Shapes
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1991, Vol. 34, 1439. doi:10.1044/jshr.3406.1439
History: Received October 10, 1990 , Accepted November 1, 1990
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1991, Vol. 34, 1439. doi:10.1044/jshr.3406.1439
History: Received October 10, 1990; Accepted November 1, 1990
In a recent paper Formby (1990)  described a simplified method for deriving the shape of the auditory filter from data obtained by measuring the threshold for a sinusoidal signal as a function of the cut-off frequency of a low-pass or high-pass noise masker. In common with other researchers in this area (Moore & Glasberg, 1983, 1987; Patterson, 1976; Patterson & Moore, 1986), Formby assumed that the threshold of the signal is proportional to the masker power at the output of the auditory filter used to detect the signal. As his Figure 1 indicated, this means that the signal threshold is proportional to the area under the filter over the frequency range covered by the noise. To obtain the filter shape itself, it is necessary to differentiate the function relating signal threshold to noise cut-off frequency. Formby does not appear to have done this; instead he took the slope of the function relating threshold to cut-off frequency as a measure of the filter slope. The purpose of this letter is to illustrate the size of the error resulting from this, and to show how the filter slope can be correctly derived in a simple way.
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