Stimulability as a Factor in the Phonological Generalization of Misarticulating Preschool Children The relationship among six functionally misarticulating preschool children’s phoneme-specific stimulability skills, the choice of treatment targets (i.e., stimulable or nonstimulable sounds), and generalization of correct sound production was explored in this prospective study. Each subject [age range of 4:11 (years:months) to 5:61 was taught to produce [r] and one other ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1991
Stimulability as a Factor in the Phonological Generalization of Misarticulating Preschool Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Thomas W. Powell
    Ball State University Muncie, IN
  • Mary Elbert
    Indiana University, Bloomington
  • Daniel A. Dinnsen
    Indiana University, Bloomington
  • Requests for reprints should be sent to Thomas W. Powell, PhD, Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, Ball State University, Muncie, IN 47306-0555.
Article Information
Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1991
Stimulability as a Factor in the Phonological Generalization of Misarticulating Preschool Children
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1991, Vol. 34, 1318-1328. doi:10.1044/jshr.3406.1318
History: Received February 16, 1990 , Accepted January 11, 1991
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1991, Vol. 34, 1318-1328. doi:10.1044/jshr.3406.1318
History: Received February 16, 1990; Accepted January 11, 1991

The relationship among six functionally misarticulating preschool children’s phoneme-specific stimulability skills, the choice of treatment targets (i.e., stimulable or nonstimulable sounds), and generalization of correct sound production was explored in this prospective study. Each subject [age range of 4:11 (years:months) to 5:61 was taught to produce [r] and one other sound that was absent from his or her phonetic inventory using a contrasting-minimal-pairs production approach. A multiple baseline across behaviors single-subject research design provided experimental control. For 86% of the 28 monitored sounds, generalization was consistent with pretreatment stimulability skills; production of stimulable sounds tended to improve regardless of treatment target. These results suggest that nonstimulable sounds are likely to require direct treatment; thus, generalization probe responses may be maximized by treating nonstimulable sounds rather than stimulable sounds.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported in part by grants to Indiana University from the National Institutes of Health, No. NS20976 and DC00260. We would like to acknowledge Susan Schaler, Jennifer (Tighe)
Orchard, Cheryl Tarr, and Cheryl Bennett who assisted in all phases of data collection. We are also grateful to Judith A. Giemt and Rita C. Naremore for their insightful comments on a previous version of this research. Portions of this paper were presented at the Conference on Treatment Efficacy sponsored by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Foundation, San Antonio, TX, March 1989, and at the meeting of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, St. Louis, MO, November 1989.
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