Perseveratory Coarticulation in the Speech of Profoundly Hearing-Impaired and Normally Hearing Children This study investigated the extent of perseveratory coarticulation in the VC syllables [i∫, u∫, it, ut, ik, uk] as produced by 7- and 10-year-old normally hearing and profoundly hearing-impaired children. Measures of both temporal and spectral (centroid and F2 frequency) parameters were computed. The data revealed that the hearing-impaired speakers ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1991
Perseveratory Coarticulation in the Speech of Profoundly Hearing-Impaired and Normally Hearing Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Shari R. Baum
    McGill University Montreal, Quebec
  • Robin S. Waldstein
    McGill University Montreal, Quebec
  • Requests for reprints should be sent to Shari R. Baum, PhD, School of Human Communication Disorders, McGill University, 1266 Pine Avenue West, Montreal, Quebec H3G 1A8.
Article Information
Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1991
Perseveratory Coarticulation in the Speech of Profoundly Hearing-Impaired and Normally Hearing Children
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1991, Vol. 34, 1286-1292. doi:10.1044/jshr.3406.1286
History: Received July 25, 1990 , Accepted March 5, 1991
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1991, Vol. 34, 1286-1292. doi:10.1044/jshr.3406.1286
History: Received July 25, 1990; Accepted March 5, 1991

This study investigated the extent of perseveratory coarticulation in the VC syllables [i∫, u∫, it, ut, ik, uk] as produced by 7- and 10-year-old normally hearing and profoundly hearing-impaired children. Measures of both temporal and spectral (centroid and F2 frequency) parameters were computed. The data revealed that the hearing-impaired speakers exhibited measurable but smaller effects of perseveratory coarticulation relative to the normally hearing speakers. These results are compared with studies of anticipatory coarticulation and are discussed in relation to the claim that perseveratory coarticulation is largely a result of the inertial properties of the speech production mechanism.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported in part by a grant from VOICE for Hearing Impaired Children. We are particularly grateful to the children who participated in this study. We would also like to thank
Nancy Tye-Murray, Jack Gandour, and Arlane Earley Carney for helpful comments on an earlier draft of this manuscript.
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