Anticipatory Coarticulation in the Speech of Profoundly Hearing-Impaired and Normally Hearing Children The present study investigated the extent of anticipatory coarticulation in the speech of five 7-year-old and four 10-year-old children with profound prelingual hearing impairment as compared to normally hearing age-matched control subjects. Ten tokens each of the CV syllables L[∫i, ∫u, ti, tu, ki, ku] were elicited from each of ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1991
Anticipatory Coarticulation in the Speech of Profoundly Hearing-Impaired and Normally Hearing Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Robin S. Waldstein
    McGill University Montreal, Quebec
  • Shari R. Baum
    McGill University Montreal, Quebec
  • Requests for reprints should be sent to Shari R. Baum, PhD, School of Human Communication Disorders, McGill University, Beatty Hall, 1266 Pine Avenue West, Montreal, Quebec H3G 1A8.
Article Information
Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1991
Anticipatory Coarticulation in the Speech of Profoundly Hearing-Impaired and Normally Hearing Children
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1991, Vol. 34, 1276-1285. doi:10.1044/jshr.3406.1276
History: Received April 23, 1990 , Accepted February 26, 1991
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1991, Vol. 34, 1276-1285. doi:10.1044/jshr.3406.1276
History: Received April 23, 1990; Accepted February 26, 1991

The present study investigated the extent of anticipatory coarticulation in the speech of five 7-year-old and four 10-year-old children with profound prelingual hearing impairment as compared to normally hearing age-matched control subjects. Ten tokens each of the CV syllables L[∫i, ∫u, ti, tu, ki, ku] were elicited from each of the children. Both temporal and spectral (centrold and F2 frequency) analyses were conducted to explore the influence of the following vocalic environment on the initial consonants. The data indicated that the hearing-impaired children displayed evidence of coarticulation on most measures, but they did so to a lesser degree when compared to the normally hearing children. The results are discussed in relation to theories of speech production in the hearing impaired, and their implications for the development of coarticulation are considered.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported in part by a grant from VOICE for Hearing Impaired Children. We are particularly grateful to the children who participated in this study. We would also like to thank Arlene Earley Carney, Bill Katz, Randall Monsen, Emily Tobey, and an anonymous reviewer for comments on an earlier draft of this manuscript.
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