Anticipatory Coarticulation in the Speech of Adults and Young Children Acoustic, Perceptual, and Video Data Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1991
Anticipatory Coarticulation in the Speech of Adults and Young Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • William F. Katz
    University of Texas at Dallas
  • Clarissa Kripke
    Harvard College Cambridge, MA
  • Paula Tallal
    Rutgers University Newark, NJ
  • Requests for reprints should be sent to William F. Katz, PhD, University of Texas at Dallas, Callier Center for Communication Disorders, 1966 Inwood Road, Dallas, TX 75235-7298.
  • Currently affiliated with Temple University Medical School, Philadelphia
    Currently affiliated with Temple University Medical School, Philadelphia×
Article Information
Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1991
Anticipatory Coarticulation in the Speech of Adults and Young Children
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1991, Vol. 34, 1222-1232. doi:10.1044/jshr.3406.1222
History: Received July 10, 1990 , Accepted January 22, 1991
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1991, Vol. 34, 1222-1232. doi:10.1044/jshr.3406.1222
History: Received July 10, 1990; Accepted January 22, 1991

Three experiments investigated anticipatory lingual and labial coarticulation in the [sV] productions of children and adults. Acoustic, perceptual, and video data were used to trace the development of intrasyllabic coarticulation in the speech of adults and children (ages 3, 5, and 8 years). Although children show greater variability in their articulatory patterns than adults, the data do not support claims that young children produce a greater degree of intrasyllabic coarticulation than older children or adults. Rather, the acoustic and video data suggest that young children and adults produce similar patterns of anticipatory coarticulation, and the perceptual data indicate that coarticulatory cues in the speech of 3-year-old children are less perceptible than those of the other age groups.

Acknowledgments
The authors thank Carol Myers and Robin Barron for their help in subject testing, and Charlene Payne, Cindy Diamond, and Kimberly Guber for assistance in data processing. We also thank Bruno Repp, Frederika Bell-Berti, and one anonymous reviewer for helpful comments of an earlier version of the manuscript. This research was funded by grant NS 08176-01A1 to William Katz, by grant NINCDS-NS9 to Paula Tallal, and by support from the MacArthur Foundation.
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