Interobserver Reliability Using the Phonetic Level Evaluation With Severely and Profoundly Hearing-Impaired Children This study examines whether observers reliably categorize selected speech production behaviors in hearing-impaired children. A group of experienced speech-language pathologists was trained to score the elicited imitations of 5 profoundly and 5 severely hearing-impaired subjects using the Phonetic Level Evaluation (Ling, 1976). Interrater reliability was calculated using intraclass correlation coefficients. ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 1991
Interobserver Reliability Using the Phonetic Level Evaluation With Severely and Profoundly Hearing-Impaired Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Stephanie Shaw
    School of Communicative Disorders Cumberland College of Health Sciences Sydney, Australia
  • Truman E. Coggins
    Child Development and Mental Retardation Center University of Washington Seattle, WA
  • Requests for reprints should be sent to Truman E. Coggins, CDMRC (WJ-10), University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195.
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1991
Interobserver Reliability Using the Phonetic Level Evaluation With Severely and Profoundly Hearing-Impaired Children
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1991, Vol. 34, 989-999. doi:10.1044/jshr.3405.989
History: Received January 11, 1990 , Accepted January 4, 1991
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1991, Vol. 34, 989-999. doi:10.1044/jshr.3405.989
History: Received January 11, 1990; Accepted January 4, 1991

This study examines whether observers reliably categorize selected speech production behaviors in hearing-impaired children. A group of experienced speech-language pathologists was trained to score the elicited imitations of 5 profoundly and 5 severely hearing-impaired subjects using the Phonetic Level Evaluation (Ling, 1976). Interrater reliability was calculated using intraclass correlation coefficients. Overall, the magnitude of the coefficients was found to be considerably below what would be accepted in published behavioral research. Failure to obtain acceptably high levels of reliability suggests that the Phonetic Level Evaluation may not yet be an accurate and objective speech assessment measure for hearing-impaired children.

Acknowledgments
This study was supported by the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia (Grant No. 840234). The investigators wish to thank Sharon Dubb, without whose help and expertise this project could not have been completed. We are indeed grateful to the hearing-impaired children who served as subjects, our speech-language pathologist colleagues who participated as reliability judges, and Ken Ottenbacher who, along with his laptop computer, did a masterful job in managing the data. Gudonya! Finally, we express our sincere appreciation to Roger Ingham, who encouraged and assisted the first author in obtaining the research grant that supported this endeavor.
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