Clinical Applications of Otoacoustic Emissions On the basis of recent advances in auditory physiology, new tests of cochlear function have been developed using measures of otoacoustic emissions. In the present report, the clinical potential for each of the four basic emission types is examined. In addition, the practical advantages of examining the ear with two ... Featured Article
Featured Article  |   October 01, 1991
Clinical Applications of Otoacoustic Emissions
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Brenda L. Lonsbury-Martin
    Department of Otolaryngology School of Medicine University of Miami, Miami, FL
  • Martin L. Whitehead
    Department of Otolaryngology School of Medicine University of Miami, Miami, FL
  • Glen K. Martin
    Department of Otolaryngology School of Medicine University of Miami, Miami, FL
  • Requests for reprints should be sent to Brenda L. Lonsbury-Martin, PhD, University of Miami Ear Institute, Department of Otolaryngology, (D-48), P.O. Box 016960, Miami, FL 33101.
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Hearing Disorders / Hearing / Featured Article
Featured Article   |   October 01, 1991
Clinical Applications of Otoacoustic Emissions
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1991, Vol. 34, 964-981. doi:10.1044/jshr.3405.964
History: Received December 18, 1990 , Accepted July 9, 1991
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1991, Vol. 34, 964-981. doi:10.1044/jshr.3405.964
History: Received December 18, 1990; Accepted July 9, 1991

On the basis of recent advances in auditory physiology, new tests of cochlear function have been developed using measures of otoacoustic emissions. In the present report, the clinical potential for each of the four basic emission types is examined. In addition, the practical advantages of examining the ear with two specific types of evoked emissions, transiently evoked and distortion-product otoacoustic emissions, are reviewed in detail. Finally, the future role of tests of otoacoustic emissions in the diagnosis of hearing impairment is discussed. The current view is that evoked emissions hold promise as an essential part of the clinical examination of the auditory system.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported in part by grants from the Public Health Service (DC00313, DC00613, ES03500). The authors thank M.J. McCoy, B. B. Stagner, D. J. Murray, and D. L. Himes for technical assistance, and reviewers T. L. Wiley, R. F. Burkard, C. G. Fowler, and M. P. Gorga for their helpful suggestions on improving the report.
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