Conductive Hearing Loss During Infancy Effects on Later Auditory Brain Stem Electrophysiology Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 1991
Conductive Hearing Loss During Infancy
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Adele D. Gunnarson
    Lamar University Beaumont, TX
  • Terese Finitzo
    Lamar University Beaumont, TX
  • Requests for reprints should be sent to Adele D. Gunnarson, PhD, Lamar University, P. O. Box 10076, Beaumont, TX 77710.
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1991
Conductive Hearing Loss During Infancy
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1991, Vol. 34, 1207-1215. doi:10.1044/jshr.3405.1207
History: Received July 19, 1989 , Accepted November 1, 1990
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1991, Vol. 34, 1207-1215. doi:10.1044/jshr.3405.1207
History: Received July 19, 1989; Accepted November 1, 1990

Long-term effects on auditory electrophysiology from early fluctuating hearing loss were studied in 27 children, aged 5 to 7 years, who had been evaluated originally in infancy. For controls (Group A), infant auditory brain stem responses (ABRs) were normal from birth to age 2 years. A second group (Group B) had intermittent conductive hearing loss. A third group (Group C) had more abnormal ABRs during infancy than Group B and more severe and frequent conductive hearing loss. For this follow-up study, all children had normal peripheral hearing at test. ABRs were obtained to monaural and binaural stimuli. Binaural interaction (BI) in the ABR was assessed in difference traces, derived by subtracting summed binaural from summed monaural waveforms.

Controls differed from both groups with early hearing loss for wave III and wave V latencies and interpeak I–III and I–V latencies. There was a significant difference in the presence of BI. Eight of 9 A subjects and 8 of 9 B subjects, but only 4 of 9 C subjects, had demonstrable BI. Findings suggest that early fluctuating hearing loss disrupts later auditory brain stem electrophysiology.

Acknowledgments
We gratefully acknowledge the support of the American Hearing Research Foundation and NIH grant NS 19675. The discussions, advice, and statistical assistance of Dr. Kenneth Pool, Dr. Linda Hood, and John Chyu are most appreciated. Dr. Aaron Thornton’s editorial suggestions were most appreciated.
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