Test-Retest Reliability in Tympanometry Test-retest reliability for tympanometric measures was evaluated across five sessions in 20 subjects with normal hearing and normal middle-ear function. Tympanograms were obtained on each ear for probe frequencies of 226, 678, and 1000 Hz using both ascending and descending directions of pressure change. Across all conditions, the tympanometric measure ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 1991
Test-Retest Reliability in Tympanometry
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Terry L. Wiley
    University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Kathryn A. Barrett
    University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Requests for reprints should be sent to Terry L. Wiley, PhD, Department of Communicative Disorders, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1975 Willow Drive, Madison, Wl 53706.
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Hearing Disorders / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1991
Test-Retest Reliability in Tympanometry
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1991, Vol. 34, 1197-1206. doi:10.1044/jshr.3405.1197
History: Received August 9, 1990 , Accepted December 8, 1990
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1991, Vol. 34, 1197-1206. doi:10.1044/jshr.3405.1197
History: Received August 9, 1990; Accepted December 8, 1990

Test-retest reliability for tympanometric measures was evaluated across five sessions in 20 subjects with normal hearing and normal middle-ear function. Tympanograms were obtained on each ear for probe frequencies of 226, 678, and 1000 Hz using both ascending and descending directions of pressure change. Across all conditions, the tympanometric measure that consistently demonstrated the highest test-retest reliability was compensated static acoustic admittance. Test-retest correlations for peak compensated static acoustic admittance measures were higher than those for ambient measures across all probe frequencies and both directions of pressure change; the differences in correlations for peak and ambient measures, however, reached significance only for 226-Hz conditions. Across-session correlations for tympanogram width did not differ significantly for measures referenced to the lowest tympanogram tail and those referenced to +200 daPa.

Acknowledgments
The authors wish to thank Dee K. Vetter for her advice regarding statistical analyses, Scott Rose for necessary software development, and Nicolet Instrument Corporation, Madison, WI, for the use of the Aurora system used in data collection. A paper based on portions of this research was presented at the 1989 Annual Convention of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association in St. Louis, Mo.
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