Effects of Different Frequency Response Strategies Upon Recognition and Preference for Audible Speech Stimuli The purpose of this study was to examine whether the amount of low. versus high-frequency amplification should change as a function of input level, as is done in some recently developed hearing aids. Adults with high-frequency sensorineural hearing loss served as subjects. Both identification performance and preference judgments for audible ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 1991
Effects of Different Frequency Response Strategies Upon Recognition and Preference for Audible Speech Stimuli
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Amy R. Horwitz
    Syracuse University
  • Christopher W. Turner
    Syracuse University
  • David A. Fabry
    Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, DC
  • Requests for reprints should be sent to Amy Horwitz, Communication Sciences and Disorders, Syracuse University, 805 South Crouse Avenue, Syracuse, NY 13244-2280.
  • Currently affiliated wortMh ayo Clinic, Rochester, MN.
    Currently affiliated wortMh ayo Clinic, Rochester, MN.×
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Hearing Disorders / Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Audiologic / Aural Rehabilitation / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1991
Effects of Different Frequency Response Strategies Upon Recognition and Preference for Audible Speech Stimuli
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1991, Vol. 34, 1185-1196. doi:10.1044/jshr.3405.1185
History: Received March 2, 1990 , Accepted December 19, 1990
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1991, Vol. 34, 1185-1196. doi:10.1044/jshr.3405.1185
History: Received March 2, 1990; Accepted December 19, 1990

The purpose of this study was to examine whether the amount of low. versus high-frequency amplification should change as a function of input level, as is done in some recently developed hearing aids. Adults with high-frequency sensorineural hearing loss served as subjects. Both identification performance and preference judgments for audible CV syllables were assessed as a function of input level for three different signal processing conditions both in quiet and in noise. The first signal processing condition was a conventional high-pass frequency response that did not change its transfer function as the input level increased; the second condition was similar to a typical adaptive frequency response (AFR) hearing aid: a high-pass frequency response that became increasingly high-pass as the input level increased; the third condition was similar to the K-Amp hearing aid recommended by Killion (1988) : a high-pass frequency response that became more broadband as the input level increased. Results indicated no significant differences among the three different processing conditions for syllable recognition and a strong listener preference for the syllables presented via the conventional amplification scheme.

Acknowledgments
The experiments described in this paper are based upon the master’s degree thesis of the first author, A. Horwitz. This research was supported in part by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Foundation and also by a grant from NIDCD (DC00377).
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