Otitis Media in Early Childhood and Later Language The relationship between early otitis media with effusion (OME) experience and later language development was examined in a prospective cohort study of 30 children from middle-class families and 33 children from low-income families. Ear status was monitored using otoscopy and tympanometry during wellness and illness periods between birth and 3 ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 1991
Otitis Media in Early Childhood and Later Language
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Joanne E. Roberts
    Division of Speech and Hearing Sciences and Frank Porter Graham Child Development Center University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Margaret R. Burchinal
    Department of Psychology and Frank Porter Graham Child Development Center University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Brenda P. Davis
    Frank Porter Graham Child Development Center Unmversty of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Albert M. Collier
    Department of Pediatrics and Frank Porter Graham Child Development Center University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Frederick W. Henderson
    Department of Pediatrics and Frank Porter Graham Child Development Center University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Requests for reprints should be sent to Joanne E. Roberts, PhD, Frank Porter Graham Child Development Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, CB#8180, 105 Smith Level Road, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-8180.
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Language Disorders / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1991
Otitis Media in Early Childhood and Later Language
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1991, Vol. 34, 1158-1168. doi:10.1044/jshr.3405.1158
History: Received July 6, 1990 , Accepted January 30, 1991
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1991, Vol. 34, 1158-1168. doi:10.1044/jshr.3405.1158
History: Received July 6, 1990; Accepted January 30, 1991

The relationship between early otitis media with effusion (OME) experience and later language development was examined in a prospective cohort study of 30 children from middle-class families and 33 children from low-income families. Ear status was monitored using otoscopy and tympanometry during wellness and illness periods between birth and 3 years of age. Language was assessed using standardized tests and a language sample between 4 1/2 and 6 years Findings suggested no reliable relationship between early OME experience and later language development.

Acknowledgments
This study was supported in part by grants from the Maternal and Child Health Program (MCJ-370599, Title V, Social Security Act), Health Resources and Services Administration, Department of Health and Human Sen/ices; Office of Special Education Programs (Department of Education G008400664 and G008630131); Deafness Research Foundation; American Speech-Language-Hearing Foundation and Psi lota Xi Sorority; National Institutes of Health (Biomedical Research Support Grant Program, Division of Research Resources) (BRSG 2 507 RR07072); Environmental Protection Agency (CR807392); and National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (5-P50-HL-19171). Special thanks to children and parents at the Frank Porter Graham Family Child Care Program for their participation in this project.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access