Redundancy Enhances Emotional Inferencing by Right- and Left-Hemisphere-Damaged Adults This study investigated the influence of enhanced textual redundancy on affective interpretations made by unilaterally right or left hemisphere brain-damaged adults and normally aging control subjects. Emotional inferences were drawn from linguistic or prosodic material, and redundancy effects were examined within and across stimulus boundaries. Results indicate that heightened semantic ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 1991
Redundancy Enhances Emotional Inferencing by Right- and Left-Hemisphere-Damaged Adults
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Connie A. Tompkins
    Department of Communication University of Pittsburgh, PA
  • Requests for reprints should be sent to Connie A. Tompkins, PhD, 1101 Cathedral of Learning, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260.
Article Information
Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Language Disorders / Aphasia / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1991
Redundancy Enhances Emotional Inferencing by Right- and Left-Hemisphere-Damaged Adults
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1991, Vol. 34, 1142-1149. doi:10.1044/jshr.3405.1142
History: Received September 4, 1990 , Accepted December 2, 1990
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1991, Vol. 34, 1142-1149. doi:10.1044/jshr.3405.1142
History: Received September 4, 1990; Accepted December 2, 1990

This study investigated the influence of enhanced textual redundancy on affective interpretations made by unilaterally right or left hemisphere brain-damaged adults and normally aging control subjects. Emotional inferences were drawn from linguistic or prosodic material, and redundancy effects were examined within and across stimulus boundaries. Results indicate that heightened semantic redundancy improved the accuracy of linguistic and prosodic judgments of affect for all groups. Correct prosodic judgments were also made more quickly by a subset of each group when textual redundancy was maximized. The facilitory influence of increased redundancy was not attributable solely to perseveration or response rigidity. Possible mechanisms by which semantic redundancy affects cognitive processing are considered.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported in part by Grant # NS25709 from the National Institutes of Health, by a New Investigator award from the American Speech-Language-Hearing Foundation, and by the University of Pittsburgh Research Development fund. Much appreciation goes to Susan Jackson, Vicki Francks, Beth Waks, Helen Sharp, and Cynthia Bloise for their assistance with various aspects of the project. Thanks are also due to Harmarville Rehabilitation Center, Presbyterian-University Hospital, and The Mercy Hospital of Pittsburgh for providing access to subjects.
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