Verb Particle and Preposition Acquisition in Language-Impaired Preschoolers This study examined the acquisition of verb particles and prepositions in language-impaired, language-matched, and age-matched preschool children. A videotape experimental task, in which subjects viewed and described brief action sequences, was implemented. The videotape task included particle, preposition, full noun phrase, and pronoun noun phrase items for six different particle/preposition ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 1991
Verb Particle and Preposition Acquisition in Language-Impaired Preschoolers
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ruth V. Watkins
    University of Texas at Dallas Callier Center for Communication Disorders
  • Mabel L. Rice
    University of Kansas Child Language Program
  • Requests for reprints should be sent to Ruth V. Watkins, PhD, University of Texas at Dallas, Callier Center for Communication Disorders, 1966 Inwood Road, Dallas, TX 75235.
Article Information
Language Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1991
Verb Particle and Preposition Acquisition in Language-Impaired Preschoolers
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1991, Vol. 34, 1130-1141. doi:10.1044/jshr.3405.1130
History: Received August 10, 1990 , Accepted February 11, 1991
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1991, Vol. 34, 1130-1141. doi:10.1044/jshr.3405.1130
History: Received August 10, 1990; Accepted February 11, 1991

This study examined the acquisition of verb particles and prepositions in language-impaired, language-matched, and age-matched preschool children. A videotape experimental task, in which subjects viewed and described brief action sequences, was implemented. The videotape task included particle, preposition, full noun phrase, and pronoun noun phrase items for six different particle/preposition words. Primary results indicated that the use of verb particles constituted a particularly challenging linguistic task for the language-impaired subjects relative to both their age- and language-matched peers. These results suggest multiple sources of difficulty for language-impaired children in the acquisition of grammatical form classes. Lexical and grammatical difficulties, as well as possible processing limitations, are implicated.

Acknowledgments
The research reported in this paper was supported by a NICHHD training grant (#HD07255) to the Child Language Program, University of Kansas. Thanks are extended to the children, parents, and staff of the preschool programs that participated in this study: Early Education Center, Hutchinson; Language Acquisition Preschool, Lawrence; Language Project Preschool, Lawrence; Franklin County Day Care, Ottawa; Hilltop Child Development Center, Lawrence; Montessori Children’s House, Lawrence, and Stepping Stones Day Care, Lawrence
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access