Predicting Poor-Communication Status in Preschool Children Using Risk Factors Present at Birth The speech and language status of 662 children between the ages of 30 months and 5 years was determined through the use of parent report information. Twelve of these children were reported by their parents to have been diagnosed as having a speech-language disorder, and 50 of these children were ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 1991
Predicting Poor-Communication Status in Preschool Children Using Risk Factors Present at Birth
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • J. Bruce Tomblin
    University of Iowa
  • James C. Hardy
    University of Iowa
  • Herman A. Hein
    University of Iowa
  • Requests for reprints should be sent to J. Bruce Tomblin, PhD, Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, Wendell Johnson Speech and Hearing Center, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52247.
Article Information
Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Language Disorders / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1991
Predicting Poor-Communication Status in Preschool Children Using Risk Factors Present at Birth
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1991, Vol. 34, 1096-1105. doi:10.1044/jshr.3405.1096
History: Received July 27, 1990 , Accepted January 10, 1991
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1991, Vol. 34, 1096-1105. doi:10.1044/jshr.3405.1096
History: Received July 27, 1990; Accepted January 10, 1991

The speech and language status of 662 children between the ages of 30 months and 5 years was determined through the use of parent report information. Twelve of these children were reported by their parents to have been diagnosed as having a speech-language disorder, and 50 of these children were found to be at or below the 10th percentile in language development for children of their age. Information about family background and birth history obtained when these children were born was evaluated with respect to its power to predict speech-language status in these preschool children. A set of risk criteria was found to accurately predict 55% of those children with poor communication skills and 76% of those with normal communication development. This prediction was improved by the addition of data about the child’s birth order. These results suggest that programs of preschool identification should consider the inclusion of a registry of children who are at risk for a communication disorder.

Acknowledgments
This study was supported by a grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation to Herman Hein and James Hardy. Additional support was provided by a grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH USPHS R01 DC00612-01).
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