Responses to Requests for Conversational Repair by Adults With Mental Retardation This study focused on adjustments made in conversation in response to listener feedback. Subjects consisted of 22 community-based and 22 institutionalized adults with mental retardation individually matched for full-scale IQ. For each subject, data were collected in a dyadic conversation with an investigator. During the course of the conversation, the ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 1991
Responses to Requests for Conversational Repair by Adults With Mental Retardation
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Bonnie Brinton
    Bureau of Child Research University of Kansas
  • Martin Fujiki
    Bureau of Child Research University of Kansas
  • Requests for reprints should be sent to Bonnie Brinton, PhD, TLRB 127, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602.
  • Currently affiliated with Brigham Young University, Provo, UT.
    Currently affiliated with Brigham Young University, Provo, UT.×
Article Information
Normal Language Processing / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1991
Responses to Requests for Conversational Repair by Adults With Mental Retardation
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1991, Vol. 34, 1087-1095. doi:10.1044/jshr.3405.1087
History: Received July 16, 1990 , Accepted December 14, 1990
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1991, Vol. 34, 1087-1095. doi:10.1044/jshr.3405.1087
History: Received July 16, 1990; Accepted December 14, 1990

This study focused on adjustments made in conversation in response to listener feedback. Subjects consisted of 22 community-based and 22 institutionalized adults with mental retardation individually matched for full-scale IQ. For each subject, data were collected in a dyadic conversation with an investigator. During the course of the conversation, the investigator introduced stacked sequences of three requests for clarification of the same message (“Huh?” “What?” “What?”). Each subject’s responses to these requests were analyzed. Results indicated that community-based subjects used certain sophisticated repair strategies more often than did their institutionalized peers. However, neither group of subjects was as responsive to the requests for clarification as would have been predicted considering their general levels of intellectual and linguistic functioning.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by Grant Number H133C90121 from the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research, Department of Education. The authors wish to acknowledge CLASS LTD and the Parsons State Hospital and Training Center for assistance in subject identification and selection. We also express our appreciation to Dr. James McLean and Dr. Joseph Spradlin for their comments on an earlier draft of this manuscript.
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