Assessment of the Dynamics of Vocal Fold Contact From the Electroglottogram Data From Normal Male Subjects Research Note
Research Note  |   October 01, 1991
Assessment of the Dynamics of Vocal Fold Contact From the Electroglottogram
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Robert F. Orlikoff
    Memphis State University Memphis, TN
  • Requests for reprints should be sent to Robert F. Orlikoff, PhD, Department of Audiology and Speech Pathology, Memphis Speech and Hearing Center, 807 Jefferson Avenue, Memphis, TN 38105.
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Notes
Research Note   |   October 01, 1991
Assessment of the Dynamics of Vocal Fold Contact From the Electroglottogram
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1991, Vol. 34, 1066-1072. doi:10.1044/jshr.3405.1066
History: Received June 16, 1990 , Accepted January 3, 1991
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1991, Vol. 34, 1066-1072. doi:10.1044/jshr.3405.1066
History: Received June 16, 1990; Accepted January 3, 1991

Electroglottographic (EGG) and acoustic records from 10 normal men prolonging the vowel /a/ at 60–68 dB, 70–78 dB, and 80–88 dB SPL were obtained. “Contact quotient” (EGG duty cycle) was shown to vary directly with vocal SPL. The mean contact quotient was 0.57 (SD=0.07) and varied on the order of 1% over the course of a given phonation. “Contact index,” a metric of EGG symmetry, also tended to vary with SPL. Consistent with previous qualitative descriptions of EGG morphology in modal register voice, the contact ndex averaged –0.52 (SD=0.08), indicating that the EGG “closing phase” represents about 24% of the entire “contact phase” Contact index was more variable than contact quotient on consecutive EGG waves, varying by about 10% during phonation. Subjects were also instructed to produce a slow crescendo. Sound pressure and EGG data indicated that both the slope of Increasing EGG contact and EGG duty cycle were significantly related to the amplitude of the acoustic signal These results suggest that quantitative electroglottography may provide powerful insights nto the control and regulation of normal phonation and into the detection and characterization of pathology.

Acknowledgments
This study was supported by the Center for Research Initiatives and Strategies for the Communicatively Impaired (CRISCI), Memphis State University. The author wishes to thank R. J. Baken and J. C. Kahane for helpful suggestions made during the course of this research, J. S. Matesich and S. Tan for their technical assistance, and R. Mayo for his assistance in data collection. An earlier version of this paper was presented at the Annual Convention of the American-Speech-Language-Hearing Association, St. Louis, MO, November 1989.
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