Effects of Long-Term Tracheostomy on Spectral Characteristics of Vowel Production This study investigated the effects of long-term tracheostomy on the development of speech. Eight children who underwent tracheotomy during the prelingual period were compared to matched controls on selected spectral parameters of the speech acoustic signal and standard measures of oral-motor, phonologic, and articulatory proficiency. Analysis of formant frequency values ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 1991
Effects of Long-Term Tracheostomy on Spectral Characteristics of Vowel Production
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ruth Saletsky Kamen
    University of Texas at Dallas/Callier Center for Communication Disorders
  • Ben C. Watson
    University of Texas at Dallas/Callier Center for Communication Disorders
  • Requests for reprints should be sent to Ruth Saletsky Kamen, PhD, UTD/Callier Center for Communication Disorders, 1966 Inwood Road, Dallas, TX 75235.
Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1991
Effects of Long-Term Tracheostomy on Spectral Characteristics of Vowel Production
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1991, Vol. 34, 1057-1065. doi:10.1044/jshr.3405.1057
History: Received June 28, 1990 , Accepted December 6, 1990
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1991, Vol. 34, 1057-1065. doi:10.1044/jshr.3405.1057
History: Received June 28, 1990; Accepted December 6, 1990

This study investigated the effects of long-term tracheostomy on the development of speech. Eight children who underwent tracheotomy during the prelingual period were compared to matched controls on selected spectral parameters of the speech acoustic signal and standard measures of oral-motor, phonologic, and articulatory proficiency. Analysis of formant frequency values revealed significant between-group differences. Children with histories of long-term tracheostomy showed reduced acoustic vowel space, as defined by group formant frequency values. This suggests that these children were limited in their ability to produce extreme vocal tract configurations for vowels /a,i,u/ postdecannulation. Oral motor patterns were less mature, and sound substitutions were not only more variable for this group, but also reflected a persistent overlay of maladaptive compensations developed during cannulation.

Acknowledgments
The present study presents a portion of a doctoral dissertation completed by author Kamen at the University of Texas at Dallas/ Callier Center for Communication Disorders. Great appreciation is extended to the children and parents who participated in this study. Deepest gratitude is extended to Dr. Sylvan Stool, Department of Otolaryngology, Pittsburgh Children’s Hospital, and Dr. Gary Goodman, Critical Care/Pulmonology, Children’s Hospital of Orange County, California, for their referrals and belief in this study; and to Drs. Ben Watson, Frances Freeman, and BAK for their input and support throughout the course of this project. Appreciation is extended to Dr. Peter Assmann for his critical review of this manuscript. Portions of this research were presented at the 1989 Conventions of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, St. Louis; Society of Ear Nose and Throat Advances in Children (SENTAC); and Association for Research in Otolaryngology (ARO), Tampa.
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