The Effects of Minimal Pairs Treatment on the Speech-Sound Production of Two Children With Phonologic Disorders Two children whose speech-sound production could be described by phonologic processes were administered a linguistically based treatment program that utilized minimal pair words. A subset of phonemes affected by a target phonologic process was taught consecutively. Spontaneous picture-naming probes were administered periodically to measure speech-sound production for all phonemes affected ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 1991
The Effects of Minimal Pairs Treatment on the Speech-Sound Production of Two Children With Phonologic Disorders
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Cari B. Saben
    Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences University of California, Santa Barbara
  • Janis Costello Ingham
    Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences University of California, Santa Barbara
  • Requests for reprints should be sent to either author, Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of California, Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA 93106.
  • Authorship is equal.
    Authorship is equal.×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1991
The Effects of Minimal Pairs Treatment on the Speech-Sound Production of Two Children With Phonologic Disorders
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1991, Vol. 34, 1023-1040. doi:10.1044/jshr.3405.1023
History: Received July 9, 1990 , Accepted January 17, 1991
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1991, Vol. 34, 1023-1040. doi:10.1044/jshr.3405.1023
History: Received July 9, 1990; Accepted January 17, 1991

Two children whose speech-sound production could be described by phonologic processes were administered a linguistically based treatment program that utilized minimal pair words. A subset of phonemes affected by a target phonologic process was taught consecutively. Spontaneous picture-naming probes were administered periodically to measure speech-sound production for all phonemes affected by the targeted phonologic process and several control phonologic processes. For both subjects, motoric components (i.e., models and phonetic placement cues) had to be added to the minimal pairs treatment. With the added motoric components, both subjects successfully passed through all treatment steps. However, neither subject generalized modified speech-sound production to treated phonemes in untreated words or to untreated phonemes affected by the target phonologic process.

Acknowledgments
The authors thank Diane Gilchrist and Merrilyn Gow for their invaluable assistance as reliability recorders for the probe data and Karen Taira and Jessica Norhausen, who served as reliability observers during treatment sessions.
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