Syllabic Stress and the Occurrence of Stuttering The occurrence of stuttering on stress-peak and unstressed syllables in connected speech was studied in 10 young adult stutterers. Results showed a significant coincidence of stutter events and syllabic stress peaks, particularly in polysyllabic words. Stuttering on the first three words of principal clauses, however, appeared independent of syllabic stress. ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 1991
Syllabic Stress and the Occurrence of Stuttering
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • David Prins
    University of Washington
  • Carol P. Hubbard
    University of Washington
  • Michelle Krause
    University of Washington
  • Requests for reprints should be sent to David Prins, PhD, Speech and Hearing Sciences, Eagleson Hall, JG-15, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195.
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1991
Syllabic Stress and the Occurrence of Stuttering
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1991, Vol. 34, 1011-1016. doi:10.1044/jshr.3405.1011
History: Received September 17, 1990 , Accepted January 3, 1991
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1991, Vol. 34, 1011-1016. doi:10.1044/jshr.3405.1011
History: Received September 17, 1990; Accepted January 3, 1991

The occurrence of stuttering on stress-peak and unstressed syllables in connected speech was studied in 10 young adult stutterers. Results showed a significant coincidence of stutter events and syllabic stress peaks, particularly in polysyllabic words. Stuttering on the first three words of principal clauses, however, appeared independent of syllabic stress. Similarities between the loci of stutter events and segmental errors of speech are considered in relation to explanations that regard stuttering as evidence of failure in normal speech production processes.

Acknowledgment
This research was supported in part by the Graduate School Research Fund, University of Washington, PHS Grant Number RR-07096. The authors wish to thank Fred D. Minifie, David Snow, and Carol Stoel-Gammon for making the syllabic stress judgments and, especially, David Snow for his suggestions concerning experimental procedures.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access