Teaching Vowels to Profoundly Hearing-Impaired Speakers Using Glossometry Glossometry was used to teach the four point vowels (/i, æu,a/) to 6 profoundly hearing-impaired children. Prior to treatment, all subjects evidenced centralized tongue positions during vowel productions. After 15 to 20 fifty-minute training sessions over 3- to 4-week time periods, all subjects showed greater diversification of tongue postures for ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 1991
Teaching Vowels to Profoundly Hearing-Impaired Speakers Using Glossometry
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Samuel G. Fletcher
    University of Alabama at Birmingham
  • Paul A. Dagenais
    University of Alabama at Birmingham
  • Paula Critz-Crosby
    University of Alabama at Birmingham
  • Requests for reprints should be sent to Paul A. Dagenais, Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, University of South Alabama, Mobile, AL 36688.
  • Currently affiliated with University of South Alabama.
    Currently affiliated with University of South Alabama.×
Article Information
Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 1991
Teaching Vowels to Profoundly Hearing-Impaired Speakers Using Glossometry
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1991, Vol. 34, 943-956. doi:10.1044/jshr.3404.943
History: Received December 6, 1989 , Accepted November 20, 1990
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1991, Vol. 34, 943-956. doi:10.1044/jshr.3404.943
History: Received December 6, 1989; Accepted November 20, 1990

Glossometry was used to teach the four point vowels (/i, æu,a/) to 6 profoundly hearing-impaired children. Prior to treatment, all subjects evidenced centralized tongue positions during vowel productions. After 15 to 20 fifty-minute training sessions over 3- to 4-week time periods, all subjects showed greater diversification of tongue postures for the vowels, especially in tongue height. Listener identifications were generally better after therapy. The training results suggested that visually presented models and feedback of tongue positions can facilitate more appropriate tongue postures and improve vowel intelligibility by hearing-impaired speakers.

Acknowledgments
This study was funded by NIH grants NS24697 and DC00406. The authors would like to thank Stephen C. Smith for software development and systems maintenance, Sherry M. Sutphin for manufacturing pseudopalates and assistance with data reduction, and James E. Flege for assistance in preparation of the manuscript.
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