Teaching Consonants to Profoundly Hearing-Impaired Speakers Using Palatometry Five profoundly hearing-impaired children were taught the consonants /t,d,k,g,s,z∫/ using palatometry. Changes in linguapalatal contact patterns and listener perceptions showed significant improvement in the place and manner of consonants produced by all subjects. Velar stops were as easily and accurately learned as alveolar stops. Distinctive sibilants were also found by ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 1991
Teaching Consonants to Profoundly Hearing-Impaired Speakers Using Palatometry
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Samuel G. Fletcher
    University of Alabama at Birmingham
  • Paul A. Dagenais
    University of Alabama at Birmingham
  • Paula Critz-Crosby
    University of Alabama at Birmingham
  • Requests for reprints should be sent to Paul A. Dagenais, Ph.D., Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, University of South Alabama, Mobile, AL 36688.
  • Currently affiliated with University of South Alabama, Mobile
    Currently affiliated with University of South Alabama, Mobile×
Article Information
Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 1991
Teaching Consonants to Profoundly Hearing-Impaired Speakers Using Palatometry
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1991, Vol. 34, 929-943. doi:10.1044/jshr.3404.929
History: Received January 23, 1990 , Accepted November 1, 1990
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1991, Vol. 34, 929-943. doi:10.1044/jshr.3404.929
History: Received January 23, 1990; Accepted November 1, 1990

Five profoundly hearing-impaired children were taught the consonants /t,d,k,g,s,z∫/ using palatometry. Changes in linguapalatal contact patterns and listener perceptions showed significant improvement in the place and manner of consonants produced by all subjects. Velar stops were as easily and accurately learned as alveolar stops. Distinctive sibilants were also found by the end of training. Sounds not previously present in a subject’s phonetic repetoire were learned more accurately than those present but inaccurate prior to therapy. Voicing errors persisted. Two of the subjects showed evidence of newly established, unsolicited coarticulated movements. The results indicated that visual articulatory modeling and feedback of linguapalatal contact patterns is an effective means of teaching consonants and improving speech intelligibility.

Acknowledgments
This study was funded by NIH Grants NS24697 and DC00406. The authors would like to thank Stephen C. Smith for software development and systems maintenance and Sherry M. Sutphin for manufacturing pseudopalate and assistance with data reduction.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access