Repair Strategy Usage by Hearing-Impaired Adults and Changes Following Communication Therapy This investigation documented how hearing-impaired individuals use communication repair strategies in structured settings and determined whether these strategies could be changed by communication therapy. Eight hearing-impaired adults with mild to severe sensorineural hearing losses practiced using five repair strategies when they did not correctly speechread a videotaped sentence. The strategies ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 1991
Repair Strategy Usage by Hearing-Impaired Adults and Changes Following Communication Therapy
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Nancy Tye-Murray
    Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery University of Iowa Iowa City
  • Requests for reprints should be sent to Nancy Tye-Murray, Department of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, IA 52242.
Article Information
Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 1991
Repair Strategy Usage by Hearing-Impaired Adults and Changes Following Communication Therapy
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1991, Vol. 34, 921-928. doi:10.1044/jshr.3404.921
History: Received April 3, 1990 , Accepted November 1, 1990
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1991, Vol. 34, 921-928. doi:10.1044/jshr.3404.921
History: Received April 3, 1990; Accepted November 1, 1990

This investigation documented how hearing-impaired individuals use communication repair strategies in structured settings and determined whether these strategies could be changed by communication therapy. Eight hearing-impaired adults with mild to severe sensorineural hearing losses practiced using five repair strategies when they did not correctly speechread a videotaped sentence. The strategies included asking the talker to (a) repeat the sentence, (b) simplify it, (c) rephrase it, (d) say an important key word, and (e) speak two sentences. Therapy consisted of computerized interactive activities and role-playing with a clinician. Seven hearing-impaired adults served as control subjects and received no therapy. Before and during therapy, subjects usually wanted a misperceived sentence to be repeated. On average, subjects changed their use of repair strategies following therapy. They utilized the repeat strategy less often and other strategies more often.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by the Easter Seal Research Foundation, NIH/NINCDS Program Project Grant N520466, the Iowa Lions Sight and Hearing Foundation, and the University of Iowa Video Center. I thank Richard Tyler for his comments on an earlier version of this manuscript; two anonymous reviewers; and Danette Evers, Karen Iler Kirk, and Kathryn Pritchett Otto for their assistance in data collection.
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