Melodic, Rhythmic, and Timbral Perception of Adult Cochlear Implant Users The purpose of this pilot study was to investigate adult Ineraid and Nucleus cochlear implant (CI) users’ perceptual accuracy for melodic and rhythmic patterns, and quality ratings for different musical instruments. Subjects were 18 postlingually deafened adults with CI experience. Evaluative measures included the Primary Measures of Music Audiation (PMMA) ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 1991
Melodic, Rhythmic, and Timbral Perception of Adult Cochlear Implant Users
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kate Gfeller
    The University of Iowa, Iowa City
  • Charissa R. Lansing
    The University of Iowa, Iowa City
  • Requests for reprints should be sent to Kate Gfeller, School of Music, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242.
  • Currently affiliated with the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
    Currently affiliated with the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign×
Article Information
Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 1991
Melodic, Rhythmic, and Timbral Perception of Adult Cochlear Implant Users
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1991, Vol. 34, 916-920. doi:10.1044/jshr.3404.916
History: Received December 27, 1989 , Accepted November 1, 1990
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1991, Vol. 34, 916-920. doi:10.1044/jshr.3404.916
History: Received December 27, 1989; Accepted November 1, 1990

The purpose of this pilot study was to investigate adult Ineraid and Nucleus cochlear implant (CI) users’ perceptual accuracy for melodic and rhythmic patterns, and quality ratings for different musical instruments. Subjects were 18 postlingually deafened adults with CI experience. Evaluative measures included the Primary Measures of Music Audiation (PMMA) and a Musical Instrument Quality Rating. Performance scores on the PMMA were correlated with speech perception measures, music background, and subject characteristics. Results demonstrated a broad range of perceptual accuracy and quality ratings across subjects. On these measures, performance for temporal contrasts was better than for melodic contrasts independent of CI device. Trends in the patterns of correlations between speech and music perception suggest that particular structural elements of music are differentially accessible to cochlear implant users. Additionally, notable qualitative differences for ratings of musical instruments were observed between Nucleus and Ineraid users

Acknowledgments
This project was supported in part by NIH Grant #CDFt P01 NS20466, Grant RR59 from the General Clinical Research Center Program, Division of Research Resources, NIH
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