Communication and Socialization Skills at Ages 2 and 3 in “Late-Talking” Young Children Twenty-one apparently normal children between 18 and 34 months of age with slow expressive language acquisition were compared to a group of normally speaking children matched for age, SES, and sex ratio, on the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales (Sparrow, Balla, & Cicchetti, 1984) The late talkers (LTs) scored significantly lower ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 1991
Communication and Socialization Skills at Ages 2 and 3 in “Late-Talking” Young Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Rhea Paul
    Portland State University, Portland, OR
  • Shawn Spangle Looney
    Portland Public Schools Portland, OR
  • Pamela S. Dahm
    Portland Center for Hearing and Speech Portland, OR
  • Requests for reprints should be sent to Rhea Paul, Department of Speech Communication, Portland State University, PO Box 751, Portland, OR 97207.
  • Presently affiliated with Mid-Valley Children’s Gulid, Salem, OR
    Presently affiliated with Mid-Valley Children’s Gulid, Salem, OR×
Article Information
Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 1991
Communication and Socialization Skills at Ages 2 and 3 in “Late-Talking” Young Children
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1991, Vol. 34, 858-865. doi:10.1044/jshr.3404.858
History: Received January 29, 1990 , Accepted October 15, 1990
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1991, Vol. 34, 858-865. doi:10.1044/jshr.3404.858
History: Received January 29, 1990; Accepted October 15, 1990

Twenty-one apparently normal children between 18 and 34 months of age with slow expressive language acquisition were compared to a group of normally speaking children matched for age, SES, and sex ratio, on the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales (Sparrow, Balla, & Cicchetti, 1984) The late talkers (LTs) scored significantly lower not only in expressive communication, but also in receptive communication and socialization. A follow-up study of the same subjects, seen at age 3, showed nearly half the 3-year-olds with a history of LT remained delayed in expressive communication and socialization, while one third remained behind in receptive language. The data suggest that social skills are particularly vulnerable to disruption in children with late expressive language development, even after communication skills have moved into the normal range. They suggest, further, that receptive deficits do not seem, in themselves, to increase the risk of continued language delay Clinical implications of these findings are discussed.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by grants from the Meyer Memorial Trust, the American Speech-Language-Hearing Foundation, Portland State University, and the National Institutes of Health Grant #DC 00793. We wish to thank Mary Shiffer, Terril Elwood, and Robert Casteel for their assistance.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access