The Efficacy of Script Contexts in Language Comprehension Intervention With Children Who Have Mental Retardation This study was designed to investigate the effects of script-based and nonscript-based treatment on the language comprehension of 4 preschool children with mental retardation. An alternating treatments design (ATD) in combination with a multiple baseline design was used to evaluate treatment effects. Treatments were comprised of three script routines and ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 1991
The Efficacy of Script Contexts in Language Comprehension Intervention With Children Who Have Mental Retardation
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Young Tae Kim
    Taegu University Taegu, Korea
  • Linda J. Lombardino
    Department of Communication Processes and Disorders University of Florida
  • Requests for reprints should be sent to Linda J. Lombardino, Department of Communication Processes and Disorders, 464 Dauer Hall, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611.
Article Information
Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 1991
The Efficacy of Script Contexts in Language Comprehension Intervention With Children Who Have Mental Retardation
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1991, Vol. 34, 845-857. doi:10.1044/jshr.3404.845
History: Received October 20, 1989 , Accepted September 28, 1990
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1991, Vol. 34, 845-857. doi:10.1044/jshr.3404.845
History: Received October 20, 1989; Accepted September 28, 1990

This study was designed to investigate the effects of script-based and nonscript-based treatment on the language comprehension of 4 preschool children with mental retardation. An alternating treatments design (ATD) in combination with a multiple baseline design was used to evaluate treatment effects. Treatments were comprised of three script routines and three nonscript activities. Two semantic constructions were selected for training and counterbalanced across subjects and treatments. Daily probes were administered to assess the effects of the treatments. The script-based treatment was more effective than the nonscript treatment in facilitating comprehension of the targeted semantic constructions in 3 of the 4 subjects.

Acknowledgments
The authors wish to thank Cynthia Thompson of the University of Florida Department of Communication Processes and Disorders for her assistance in designing this study. The basis of this research was a doctoral dissertation completed by the first author at the University of Florida, Department of Communication Processes and Disorders.
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