Communication Treatment for Adults With Dementia Intervention studies reporting improvements in communication skills in aging adults presumed to have dementia were identified and reviewed. Whereas the speech-language pathology journals have published only articles on the diagnosis and identification of communication deficits in adults with dementia, over 100 articles on treatments effecting changes in communicative deficiencies were ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 1991
Communication Treatment for Adults With Dementia
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Michelle S. Bourgeois
    University of Pittsburgh
  • Requests for reprints should be sent to Michelle S. Bourgeois, Department of Communication, University of Pittsburgh, 1117 Cathedral of Learning, Pittsburgh, PA 15260.
Article Information
Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 1991
Communication Treatment for Adults With Dementia
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1991, Vol. 34, 831-844. doi:10.1044/jshr.3404.831
History: Received February 23, 1990 , Accepted October 9, 1990
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1991, Vol. 34, 831-844. doi:10.1044/jshr.3404.831
History: Received February 23, 1990; Accepted October 9, 1990

Intervention studies reporting improvements in communication skills in aging adults presumed to have dementia were identified and reviewed. Whereas the speech-language pathology journals have published only articles on the diagnosis and identification of communication deficits in adults with dementia, over 100 articles on treatments effecting changes in communicative deficiencies were found in psychology, social work, nursing, and gerontology journals. Much evidence supports the potential for positive outcomes from communication treatment with this population. Various design and methodological flaws, however, limit the extent to which these interventions should be applied without further research. Issues of ethics and social validity are discussed, and treatment and research needs are outlined.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Disorders Association Grant IIRG-88-078 to Eye and Ear Institute of Pittsburgh. The editorial comments of Dr. Howard Goldstein and Dr Connie Tompkins are gratefully acknowledged.
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